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BBC Learning English: Video Words in the News: The oldest person to climb Everest (29th May 2013)
 
02:18
Watch our weekly news video. This week's video is: Oldest Everest climber. Meet the Japanese man who is the oldest person ever to have reached the top of Everest, 60 years after it was first climbed.
Views: 140460 BBC Learning English
Improving your memory: 6 Minute English
 
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Storing information is an important function of our brains and scientists are always looking at ways to improve it but also to stop it deteriorating. Neil and Rob discuss ways of improving your memory and teach you new vocabulary - that they hope you'll remember later! You'll find the transcript and vocabulary on our website: http://www.bbc.co.uk/learningenglish/english/features/6-minute-english/ep-190131 [Image: Getty Images] Learning English is easy! Improve your English with our free English videos and lessons on grammar, vocabulary, pronunciation and English exams. Please use English when you comment. For more free English lessons and videos visit our website: http://www.bbclearningenglish.com
Views: 301436 BBC Learning English
What makes you happy? Listen to 6 Minute English
 
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Research has suggested that while personal feelings of pleasure are the accepted definition of happiness in Western cultures, East Asian cultures tend to see happiness as social harmony and in some parts of Africa and India it's more about shared experiences and family. Neil and Rob discuss what makes people happy and ... are happy to teach you new vocabulary. You'll find the transcript here: http://www.bbc.co.uk/learningenglish/english/features/6-minute-english/ep-190124 [Image: Getty Images] Learning English is easy! Improve your English with our free English videos and lessons on grammar, vocabulary, pronunciation and English exams. Please use English when you comment. For more free English lessons and videos visit our website: http://www.bbclearningenglish.com
Views: 192788 BBC Learning English
What to do when you can't sleep: 6 Minute English
 
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What can you do when you can't sleep? Is there anything more frustrating than lying there in the dark with your eyes open especially if it's not just now and then, but night after night? According to one expert in all things to do with sleep, there is one simple and effective solution - even if it seems like the opposite of what most people would suggest. Neil and Rob find out all about it and teach you the related vocabulary. You'll find the transcript and vocabulary on our website: http://www.bbc.co.uk/learningenglish/english/features/6-minute-english/ep-190523 Learning English is easy! Improve your English with our free English videos and lessons on grammar, vocabulary, pronunciation and English exams. Please use English when you comment. For more free English lessons and videos visit our website: http://www.bbclearningenglish.com
Views: 86579 BBC Learning English
Would you eat less meat to save the environment? Listen to 6 Minute English
 
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Could you eat less meat and adopt a diet based on vegetables and fruit to help save the environment? Neil and Catherine talk about a new diet, known as flexitarianism, and teach you new vocabulary. You'll find the transcript and vocabulary on our website: http://www.bbc.co.uk/learningenglish/english/features/6-minute-english/ep-190103 [Cover: Getty Images] Learning English is easy! Improve your English with our free English videos and lessons on grammar, vocabulary, pronunciation and English exams. Please use English when you comment. For more free English lessons and videos visit our website: http://www.bbclearningenglish.com
Views: 120410 BBC Learning English
Short Vowel. Pronunciation Tips.
 
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Learn English and improve your pronunciation with our series of 44 videos designed to help improve your pronunciation and English.
Views: 1645215 BBC Learning English
Why do young people feel so lonely? Listen to 6 Minute English
 
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Visit our website: http://www.bbclearningenglish.com We all live in an over-crowded world which is fast approaching eight billion people. Despite that many individuals feel alone and isolated. The BBC did a survey about loneliness involving 55,000 people from all over the world. Neil and Sam discuss the findings and teach you new vocabulary. Vocabulary isolated far away from other places and people stereotype the noun for a simplistic view of person or group based on certain characteristics such as their nationality, age, profession and the like intensely strongly plagued by something it causes you problems and difficulties figure something out trying to understand something to regulate to control You'll find the transcript here: http://www.bbc.co.uk/learningenglish/english/features/6-minute-english/ep-181108 [Cover: Getty Images] Learn English with BBC Learning English. Every day we help you to learn English with our brilliant mix of grammar, vocabulary, pronunciation, news and inspiring English programmes. We also produce regular 'extra' videos across the week so come back every day to see what's new. Regular content MONDAY: The English We Speak MONDAY: English in a Minute TUESDAY: News Review WEDNESDAY: LingoHack THURSDAY: 6 Minute English FRIDAY: Editor's Choice Please use English when you comment. For more videos and content that will help you learn English, visit our website: http://www.bbclearningenglish.com
Views: 355422 BBC Learning English
How your eyes predict your personality - 6 Minute English
 
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Watch where you're watching! Apparently, where your eyes look can be used to predict things about your personality. Could this be the personality test of the future? Neil and Rob discuss how your eyes predict your personality and teach you related vocabulary. You'll find the transcript and the vocabulary on our website: http://www.bbc.co.uk/learningenglish/english/features/6-minute-english/ep-190321 [Cover: Getty Images] Learning English is easy! Improve your English with our free English videos and lessons on grammar, vocabulary, pronunciation and English exams. Please use English when you comment. For more free English lessons and videos visit our website: http://www.bbclearningenglish.com
Views: 100344 BBC Learning English
Why do we feel awkward? - 6 Minute English
 
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We all know the feeling. That horrible uncomfortable silence where we freeze up, or look away or just want to turn invisible. Awkwardness can strike anyone in the wrong circumstances. But why does it happen? How is it connected to rules and what does it have to do with society? Neil and Dan find out and teach you related vocabulary. You'll find the transcript and the vocabulary on our website: http://www.bbc.co.uk/learningenglish/english/features/6-minute-english/ep-190404 [Cover: Getty Images] Learning English is easy! Improve your English with our free English videos and lessons on grammar, vocabulary, pronunciation and English exams. Please use English when you comment. For more free English lessons and videos visit our website: http://www.bbclearningenglish.com
Views: 133644 BBC Learning English
Do you have a second job? Listen to 6 Minute English
 
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A quarter of workers in the UK are thought to have a side hustle. It seems that more and more people want to put their skills and passions into practice to make extra money. These tend to be entrepreneurial young people who want to work on their own projects alongside their main source of income. Are you one of them? Neil and Rob discuss side hustles and teach you related vocabulary. You'll find the transcript and vocabulary on our website: http://www.bbc.co.uk/learningenglish/english/features/6-minute-english/ep-190328 Learning English is easy! Improve your English with our free English videos and lessons on grammar, vocabulary, pronunciation and English exams. Please use English when you comment. For more free English lessons and videos visit our website: http://www.bbclearningenglish.com
Views: 119350 BBC Learning English
The smell of coffee: 6 Minute English
 
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Is there more to coffee than just drinking it? Experts say that the smell of the beans is just as important. Neil and Catherine discuss the science behind why coffee often smells better than it tastes and teach some new vocabulary along the way. Vocabulary vital very important key essential, necessary a physiological response a reaction your body has to something, like a smell to be baffled by something to be confused by something, to not understand it a chain a group of shops from the same company, all the shops have the same design and sell the same or very similar products weird unusual, strange Download the audio and a transcript here http://www.bbc.co.uk/learningenglish/english/features/6-minute-english/ep-181122 Learn English with BBC Learning English. Every day we help you to learn English with our brilliant mix of grammar, vocabulary, pronunciation, news and inspiring English programmes. We also produce regular 'extra' videos across the week so come back every day to see what's new. Regular content MONDAY: The English We Speak MONDAY: English in a Minute TUESDAY: News Review TUESDAY: English At Work WEDNESDAY: LingoHack THURSDAY: 6 Minute English FRIDAY: Editor's Choice We like receiving and reading your comments - please use English when you comment. For more videos and content that will help you learn English, visit our website: http://www.bbclearningenglish.com
Views: 234060 BBC Learning English
How to prepare for an interview - 01 - English at Work has the answers
 
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Anna has an interview at Tip Top Trading. This episode helps her and you prepare for an interview by providing answers to interview questions. English at work helps you learn the language you need to get a job and to work in an office environment. For more: http://www.bbc.co.uk/learningenglish/english/features/english-at-work
Views: 349754 BBC Learning English
Debating veganism: How to change someone's opinion - 6 Minute English
 
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Veganism is a controversial issue with strong opinions in favour and against. However, these opinion are less based on facts than you might think. What are they based on then, and how can we convince someone to change an opinion? Dan and Rob find out and teach you new vocabulary. You'll find the transcript and vocabulary on our website: http://www.bbc.co.uk/learningenglish/english/features/6-minute-english/ep-190314 [Image: Getty Images] Learning English is easy! Improve your English with our free English videos and lessons on grammar, vocabulary, pronunciation and English exams. Please use English when you comment. For more free English lessons and videos visit our website: http://www.bbclearningenglish.com
Views: 95765 BBC Learning English
Are food allergies more common now? 6 Minute English
 
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Research has suggested that food allergies may be more common these days than they were in the last 20 or 30 years. Why might this be? Is it linked to our diet? And are there any signs that a child might go on to develop a food allergy as an adult? Neil and Rob discuss if food allergies are becoming more common, and teach you new vocabulary. [Cover: Getty Images] For the transcript and vocabulary, visit our website: http://www.bbc.co.uk/learningenglish/english/features/6-minute-english/ep-190221 Learning English is easy! Improve your English with our free English videos and lessons on grammar, vocabulary, pronunciation and English exams. Please use English when you comment. For more free English lessons and videos visit our website: http://www.bbclearningenglish.com
Views: 79266 BBC Learning English
Are dating apps effective? Listen to 6 Minute English
 
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Research shows that fewer than 5% of people who have used dating apps, actually go out on a date with someone they met through them. Neil and Dan discuss the reasons for it and teach you related vocabulary. You'll find the transcript on our website: http://www.bbc.co.uk/learningenglish/english/features/6-minute-english/ep-190214 [Cover: Getty Images] Learning English is easy! Improve your English with our free English videos and lessons on grammar, vocabulary, pronunciation and English exams. Please use English when you comment. For more free English lessons and videos visit our website: http://www.bbclearningenglish.com
Views: 66615 BBC Learning English
Anxiety and evolution: Has anxiety been good for humans? 6 Minute English
 
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Can anxiety be a good thing? The psychiatrist Randolph Nesse suggests that anxiety is a result of natural selection. This is the principle of evolution whereby random changes in the biology of a living thing can make it more likely to survive in a particular environment. Rob and Neil discuss mental health and teach you related vocabulary. You'll find the transcript and the vocabulary on our website: http://www.bbc.co.uk/learningenglish/english/features/6-minute-english/ep-190502 [Cover: Getty Images] Learning English is easy! Improve your English with our free English videos and lessons on grammar, vocabulary, pronunciation and English exams. Please use English when you comment. For more free English lessons and videos visit our website: http://www.bbclearningenglish.com
Views: 59010 BBC Learning English
Pronunciation: The words 'was' and 'were'
 
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Tim's back in his Pronunciation Workshop. This time he's finding out how English speakers sometimes pronounce the words 'was' and 'were' - even though he's a bit tired. For more, visit our website: http://www.bbc.co.uk/learningenglish/english/course/towards-advanced/unit-13/session-5 Transcript: Tim Hi. I'm Tim and this is my Pronunciation Workshop. Here, I'm going to show you how English is really spoken. Come on, let's go inside. Oh dear, excuse me. I’m a bit tired: I was out late last night, with the lads. I know, yeah, we didn't get back until 9.30. In the evening. It was a wild night. I know, I know, I am a party animal. Anyway, while I get myself together a bit, let's ask some other people in London what they got up to last night. Voxpops At 9 o'clock last night I was watching a movie. I was laying in bed. I was invited to a dinner at my friend's house. I was playing football I was out drinking. Tim Well well, what interesting lives we all lead. Now they all used the past form of the verb 'to be' – was. Now the word was is made of the sounds /w/, /ɔ:/, / z/, isn’t it? Or is it? Listen again. What sound can you actually hear? Voxpops At 9 o'clock last night I was watching a movie. I was laying in bed. I was invited to a dinner at my friend's house. I was playing football I was out drinking. Tim When the word was is unstressed, as in the examples we’ve just heard, then the vowel sound changes to a schwa - /ə/. So was becomes /wəz/, and also were becomes /wə/. These are called weak forms. Here are some more examples. Examples I was there when it happened. We were delighted with the results. We were having a good time until it rained. He was feeling much better last night. Tim Right, now you've heard the examples, and now it's your turn. Listen and repeat. Examples I was there when it happened. We were delighted with the results. We were having a good time until it rained. He was feeling much better last night. Tim Great work. Remember, if you want to learn more about pronunciation, then please visit our website, bbclearningenglish dot com. And that is about it from the Pronunciation Workshop for now. I'll see you soon. Bye bye! Now… oh look! Hey, you know what this is? This is WAS backwards. Get it? WAS backwards… it's a SAW. Now, I know what you were thinking. You were thinking that I was going to have some terrible accident. Well don’t worry – it’s not even switched on – look! Wooahhhhh!!!
Views: 406510 BBC Learning English
Pronunciation: Schwa
 
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English pronunciation is easy, right? Well, maybe it isn't always a piece of cake, but Tim's back in the pronunciation workshop and ready to give a helping hand. This time he's looking at an aspect of spoken English called ‘schwa’. The symbol for the schwa sound looks like this /ə/. For more, visit our website: http://www.bbc.co.uk/learningenglish/english/course/towards-advanced/unit-6/session-5 Transcript: Tim Hi, I'm Tim and this is my pronunciation workshop. Here, I'm gonna show you how English is really spoken. It'll help you to become a better listener and a more fluent speaker. You ready? Come on, follow me. Now, there's an idiom in the English language that means that something is really easy. Any idea what it is? Well, here's a clue. Do you know now? Let's ask the people of London: Voxpops It's a piece of cake It's a piece of cake It's a piece of cake It's a piece of cake Tim A piece of cake – an expression that means that something is really easy to do, as well as meaning – a piece of cake. But listen again to the words 'a' and 'of'. They are actually pronounced the same. What is the sound and are those words stressed? Voxpops It's a piece of cake It's a piece of cake It's a piece of cake It's a piece of cake Tim The words 'a' and 'of' are both pronounced as /ə/ and they're not stressed. This sound /ə/ is the most common sound in the whole English language. It's so common that it even has its own name – schwa. Now, it can be difficult to hear the schwa because it is never stressed. However, it's a vowel sound that's used in many grammar words like articles and prepositions. Here are some more examples. Examples I like a cup of tea in the morning. Could you get a packet of biscuits? Can you give it to me? I had an apple for lunch today. Tim So, you've heard the examples, and now it's your turn. Are you ready to start? Listen and repeat. Examples I like a cup of tea in the morning. Could you get me a packet of biscuits? Can you give it to me? I had an apple for lunch today. Tim Great work. Now remember, if you want to learn more about pronunciation then please visit our website: bbclearningenglish.com. That's about it from the pronunciation workshop for now. I'll see you soon. Bye bye. Now, I've got a cup of tea and I've got a biscuit, I'm looking forward to a piece of cake. That was a mistake, but a tasty one.
Views: 178316 BBC Learning English
Short Vowel. Pronunciation Tips.
 
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Learn English and improve your pronunciation with our series of 44 videos designed to help improve your pronunciation and English.
Views: 580994 BBC Learning English
How creative should we be? Listen to 6 Minute English
 
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The World Economic Forum forecasts that by 2020, creativity will be in the top three most important skills for future jobs. This is particularly relevant for younger people who will be entering the world of work soon. BBC Learning English's very creative scriptwriter Rob and Neil discuss what it takes to be creative - and they also teach you related vocabulary. Vocabulary a creative (noun) a person whose job is to use a lot of imagination and come up with new ideas, such as someone who works in the media or advertising legitimately describes doing something fairly and reasonably think outside the box find new ways of doing things redress the balance to make things fairer and more equal lifeblood the most important thing to make something a success disparate very different and unrelated headspace when your mind is in a good state and you can think clearly You'll find the transcript here: http://www.bbc.co.uk/learningenglish/english/features/6-minute-english/ep-181025 [Cover: Getty Images] Learn English with BBC Learning English. Every day we help you to learn English with our brilliant mix of grammar, vocabulary, pronunciation, news and inspiring English programmes. We also produce regular 'extra' videos across the week so come back every day to see what's new. Regular content MONDAY: The English We Speak MONDAY: English in a Minute TUESDAY: News Review WEDNESDAY: LingoHack THURSDAY: 6 Minute English FRIDAY: Editor's Choice Please use English when you comment. For more videos and content that will help you learn English, visit our website: http://www.bbclearningenglish.com
Views: 116548 BBC Learning English
Vampire shoppers - 6 Minute English
 
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Are you a vampire shopper? Do you like shopping online? More and more people are spending the night shopping on their laptops and smartphones. But is this always a good idea? Neil and Rob discuss their shopping habits and offer you vocabulary for free! You'll find the transcript and vocabulary on our website: http://www.bbc.co.uk/learningenglish/english/features/6-minute-english/ep-190530 [Cover: Getty Images] Learning English is easy! Improve your English with our free English videos and lessons on grammar, vocabulary, pronunciation and English exams. Please use English when you comment. For more free English lessons and videos visit our website: http://www.bbclearningenglish.com
Views: 46011 BBC Learning English
BBC English Masterclass: Mixing conditionals
 
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You all know about the first, second and third conditionals, but do you know how to mix them? Dan has a lesson which will show you how. For more, visit our website: http://www.bbc.co.uk/learningenglish/english/course/towards-advanced/unit-7/session-1 Transcript: Dan Hi guys. Dan from BBC Learning English here. In this session we'll be looking at mixed conditionals. Now, I know that clever students like yourselves will know that English has three types of conditional sentences. First conditional is to talk about real, present or future situations, second conditional is to talk about hypothetical present or future situations and third conditional is to talk about hypothetical past situations. All three types of conditional are fantastic and all three types of conditional talk about events within their own time frame – present, future and past. But what about if you want to talk about an event that happened in the past - which affects the future? Can events in the present or the future affect the past? Come over here and let's take a look. Here is a third conditional sentence: If I had taken programming at school, I would have got a job at Google years ago. Here we have a past hypothetical with a past consequence. Notice the formula: 'If' plus the past perfect here, 'would' plus have plus the past participle here. Now watch what happens as we change the consequence. If I had taken programming at school, I would be working for Google. Now we have a past hypothetical with a present consequence. This part here is from a second conditional. Its formula is 'would' plus the bare infinitive. This kind of makes sense in that decisions or actions in the past affect the present. But can we do the future? Well, let's have a look. If I had taken programming at school, I would be attending the Google conference next week. Yes we can. As you can see, the only difference between the present and the future is the time expression. The formula is exactly the same: 'would' plus the infinitive. Second conditional. Did you get it? Now let's see what happens if we try to make the second – which is the present – affect the past, which is a third. If I were smarter, I would have invented something clever when I was younger. It can. Now we have a present theory with a past result. This can be a little difficult to understand, until we realise that 'if I were smarter' is the same as saying 'I am not smart' - which is present simple. And remember that we use present simple for long term truth. When I say 'I am not smart', I mean: I am not smart now, in the future and in the past. It's the same as saying 'I am English' - past, present and future. So, this kind of conditional works very well with personal descriptions. And here are a couple of other examples. If he were taller, he would have become a basketball player. If they were in love, they would have got married 10 years ago. If I were less interesting, I wouldn't have been asked to speak in public so many times. Did you get it? Good. Let's try one more. Present to past. But a little bit more specific this time. If I weren't flying on holiday next week, I would have accepted that new project at work. Here we have a present second, although it's actually future, with a past third result. This means that the person couldn't accept the project at work because they knew that they would be flying in the future. OK guys, did you get it? Mixing conditionals isn't difficult to do, as long as you both have confidence and an understanding of the verb forms. It's much easier to do a third to second than it is to do a second to third, but both are possible. And finally, don't forget the importance of time words. OK? Alright. Now, for more information have a look at bbclearningenglish.com. I've been Dan, you've been great. Have fun guys, see you next time.
Views: 61277 BBC Learning English
Being slim: Is it in our genes? Listen to 6 Minute English
 
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Scientists have found some evidence that our weight is not just controlled by what we eat. Research published in the journal PLOS Genetics, explains how twin studies have shown that about 40% of the variation in a person’s weight is influenced by their genes. Neil and Dan talk about diets and serve you a tasty helping of vocabulary. Visit our website for the transcript and vocabulary: http://www.bbc.co.uk/learningenglish/english/features/6-minute-english/ep-190516 [Cover: Getty Images] Learning English is easy! Improve your English with our free English videos and lessons on grammar, vocabulary, pronunciation and English exams. Please use English when you comment. For more free English lessons and videos visit our website: http://www.bbclearningenglish.com
Views: 64710 BBC Learning English
Speaking: Being polite - how to soften your English
 
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Improve your English speaking by learning how to be more polite. Sian's going to show you 4 ways not to offend people by being too direct. For downloadable grammar notes and a 'polite English' quiz, visit our website: http://www.bbc.co.uk/learningenglish/english/course/towards-advanced/unit-24/session-1 TRANSCRIPT Sian Hi Sian here for BBC Learning English… in this Masterclass we're going to look at something British people love doing! Being polite. No, I'm not coming to your party this evening. Wow, this food is disgusting! Give me some of your lunch. Now sometimes it’s ok to be direct – or even blunt with your friends…but it's important not to sound rude, particularly in the workplace. We're going to look at 4 ways you can soften your language to make you more polite… 1: Requests, suggestions and questions. OK, listen to these two requests. Which one sounds more polite and less direct, and why? Number 1: ‘Pick me up on your way to the party this evening!’ Or number 2: ‘I was hoping you could give me a lift to the party.’ Now, number 2 is much more polite. We soften requests, and suggestions and questions by using past forms, continuous forms or both. For example, ‘I was wondering if you could give me a lift later.’ We can also make requests softer by using a negative question with a question tag. So, ‘You couldn’t give me a lift later, could you?’ or ‘I don’t suppose you could pick me up tonight, could you?’ 2: Giving opinions OK, listen to these two opinions. Which do you think sounds less direct and more polite? Number 1: You're too young to get married! Or number 2: I reckon you're a little young to be getting married! Yeah, the second one is much less direct. It’s softer. We use verbs like reckon, guess, feel to make your opinions less direct. You can also use vague expressions like ‘sort of’, ‘kind of’, ‘a little bit’. It also helps if you make it into a question: ‘Aren’t you kind of young to be getting married?’ 3: Discussing problems Ok now listen to these two problems. Which one sounds less direct? The first one: ‘You've made a mistake in this report!’ Or the second one: ‘You seem to have made a mistake here.’ Yes, the second one was softer, less direct. We introduce problems with verbs like seem and appear to soften them. So, ‘You appear to have saved over all my documents’. You can also use these to introduce your own problems. So, ‘I seem to have lost those reports you wanted’. 4: Saying no! Now listen to these two ways of refusing an invitation. Which one sounds less direct? Number 1? ‘No, I'm not coming to your party this evening.’ or number 2? ‘I’m not sure I'll be able to make it to your party this evening.’ Ok, again the second one was much softer, less direct. We find it really hard to say no! So instead we use tentative language to soften it. So, ‘I’m not sure I’ll make it to your party.’ Or ‘It’s looking unlikely I’ll be able to come this evening.’ This basically means ‘I’m not coming!’ Now to find out more about avoiding being too direct, and to practise not being rude, I was hoping you would check out our website bbclearningenglish.com. See you soon, goodbye!
Views: 402811 BBC Learning English
The decluttering trend - How do I declutter? 6 Minute English
 
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In many consumer societies these days, people tend to buy and keep lots of things - after all, these things are cheap! But what happens when all of the things we buy become too much? What do we do with all the stuff? Recently, people have been trying to find ways to reduce the amount of stuff that they own. Rob and Neil find out all about the latest decluttering trend, how to do it and why in this 6 Minute English! You'll find the transcript and the vocabulary on our website: http://www.bbc.co.uk/learningenglish/english/features/6-minute-english/ep-190411 [Cover: Getty Images] Learning English is easy! Improve your English with our free English videos and lessons on grammar, vocabulary, pronunciation and English exams. Please use English when you comment. For more free English lessons and videos visit our website: http://www.bbclearningenglish.com
Views: 55661 BBC Learning English
Tim's top tips for progressing to advanced English - Stop Saying!
 
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Learning English can be hard work. Progress can seem particularly slow when your level gets higher. What can you do to move from intermediate to advanced? Tim has some tips in the last episode of Stop Saying. For more, visit our website:http://www.bbc.co.uk/learningenglish/english/course/upper-intermediate/unit-30/session-4
Views: 104008 BBC Learning English
Can we trust a smart speaker? Listen to 6 Minute English
 
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About ten million people in the UK now use a smart speaker, and they're gaining popularity across the world. These convenient devices listen to our every command. But when does 'listening' become 'spying'? Rob and Dan discuss smart speakers and teach you related vocabulary. You'll find the vocabulary and the transcript on our website: http://www.bbc.co.uk/learningenglish/english/features/6-minute-english/ep-190509 [Cover: Getty Images] Learning English is easy! Improve your English with our free English videos and lessons on grammar, vocabulary, pronunciation and English exams. Please use English when you comment. For more free English lessons and videos visit our website: http://www.bbclearningenglish.com
Views: 68353 BBC Learning English
Street food: Why is it becoming popular?
 
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Buying food on the street is nothing new but in the UK this idea is really taking off. It's a great way of sampling freshly cooked dishes from around the world. Rob and Neil discuss the subject and hear from an expert who explains the popularity in this type of food - plus you can learn some new vocabulary along the way. Listen to a discussion about street food and learn new items of vocabulary in just 6 minutes! To download the audio and transcript, go to http://www.bbc.co.uk/learningenglish/english/features/6-minute-english/ep-180830 [Cover: GETTY IMAGES] Do you want to learn how to speak English? Then join us here on YouTube for great grammar, drama, news, study, pronunciation, vocabulary, music, interviews and celebrity videos. Every day we have a new video to help you with English. We also produce regular 'extra' videos across the week so come back every day to see what's new. MONDAY: The English We Speak TUESDAY: News Review WEDNESDAY: LingoHack THURSDAY: 6 Minute English FRIDAY: The Experiment (watch this space for new and exciting content that we are trying out!) Please use English when you comment. For more videos and content that will help you learn English, visit our website: http://www.bbclearningenglish.com
Views: 150255 BBC Learning English
Pronunciation: Assimilation of /t/ and /p/
 
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What happens when a word ending with a /t/ sound is followed by a word beginning with a /p/ sound? Tim looks at assimilation, with the help of the Learning English team, some Londoners - and a white piece of paper! You can learn more here http://www.bbc.co.uk/learningenglish/english/course/towards-advanced/unit-1/session-5
Views: 181757 BBC Learning English
Learn different ways of talking about the future - Stop Saying
 
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http://www.bbclearningenglish.com When we think of the future, if we're thinking grammatically, we think of will. However, the future can be different depending on what we're talking about. Will is not the only future, as Tim explores in this video. Learn more here http://www.bbc.co.uk/learningenglish/english/course/upper-intermediate/unit-24/session-4
Views: 85704 BBC Learning English
Learn to talk about exercise in 6 minutes
 
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[Images: GETTY IMAGES] How many steps do you walk a day? Do you know the more the better for your health. Neil and Rob talk about the need to exercise and teach you some related vocabulary. This week's question: How many people aged between 40 and 60 do less than ten minutes brisk walking every month? Is it… a) 4%, b) 14% or c) 40%? Listen to the programme to find out the answer: http://www.bbc.co.uk/learningenglish/english/features/6-minute-english/ep-171005 Vocabulary: vigorous using a lot of energy to do something saunter walk slowly brisk quick and energetic (the opposite of sauntering) build something in (to your day or your life) include it from the beginning incrementally gradually increasing in size sedentary (job or life) it involves a lot of sitting and not much exercise Do you want to learn how to speak English? Then join us here on YouTube for great grammar, drama, news, study, pronunciation, vocabulary, music, interviews and celebrity videos. Every day we have a new video to help you with English. We also produce regular 'extra' videos across the week so come back every day to see what's new. MONDAY: The English We Speak TUESDAY: News Review TUESDAY: English At Work WEDNESDAY: LingoHack THURSDAY: 6 Minute English FRIDAY: The Experiment (watch this space for new and exciting content that we are trying out!) For more videos and content that will help you learn English, visit our website: http://www.bbclearningenglish.com
Views: 177766 BBC Learning English
Are there benefits to schadenfreude? Listen to 6 Minute English
 
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You'll find the transcript and vocabulary on our website: http://www.bbc.co.uk/learningenglish/english/features/6-minute-english/ep-190110 Do you take pleasure when someone undeserving of their success have a spot of bad luck? Not even a little pleasure? Well, if you do (like, apparently, most of us) you might like to learn the word 'schadenfreude' and the concept behind it. Rob and Neil talk about this German word also used in English and teach you new vocabulary. [Image: Getty Images] Learning English is easy! Improve your English with our free videos and lessons on grammar, vocabulary, pronunciation and English exams. Please use English when you comment. For more free English lessons and videos visit our website: http://www.bbclearningenglish.com
Views: 82744 BBC Learning English
Why do men want to be fathers? Watch 6 Minute English
 
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Why do men want to have children? Evolutionary anthropologist Anna Machin wrote a book about it and tries to answer this question. Catherine and Neil - a father himself - discuss her theories and teach you six items of related vocabulary. Vocabulary: admit to something say something is true, even if it might make you look a little bit bad to be keen on something to be very interested in and enthusiastic about something going along with something agreeing to do something even though you don't really want to do it an absent father a father who is not at home to spend time with his children disciplinarians people who have strict rules and they give out punishments when these rules aren't followed to be hands-on to be very much involved in something You'll find the transcript here: http://www.bbc.co.uk/learningenglish/english/features/6-minute-english/ep-180816 [Image: GETTY IMAGES] Do you want to learn how to speak English? Then join us here on YouTube for great grammar, drama, news, study, pronunciation, vocabulary, music, interviews and celebrity videos. Every day we have a new video to help you with English. We also produce regular 'extra' videos across the week so come back every day to see what's new. MONDAY: The English We Speak TUESDAY: News Review WEDNESDAY: LingoHack THURSDAY: 6 Minute English FRIDAY: The Experiment (watch this space for new and exciting content that we are trying out!) Please use English when you comment. For more videos and content that will help you learn English, visit our website: http://www.bbclearningenglish.com
Views: 132458 BBC Learning English
Learn to talk about bottled water in 6 minutes
 
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[Images: GETTY IMAGES] Can you tell the difference between the taste of bottled water and tap water? Is water in a bottle really better for you. Neil and Rob quench your thirst for new vocabulary and discuss H2O. This week's question: How many litres of bottled water were sold in the UK in 2016? Was it… a) 2.9 billion litres, b) 29 million litres or c) 2.9 million litres? Listen to the programme to find out the answer. Vocabulary: refreshing making you feel cool again after being hot enriched improving the quality of something by adding to it manufacture something you make it in large amounts in a factory scare somebody off make them go away by frightening them regulated controlled comes up trumps produces a good result, often unexpectedly Do you want to learn how to speak English? Then join us here on YouTube for great grammar, drama, news, study, pronunciation, vocabulary, music, interviews and celebrity videos. Every day we have a new video to help you with English. We also produce regular 'extra' videos across the week so come back every day to see what's new. MONDAY: The English We Speak TUESDAY: News Review TUESDAY: English At Work WEDNESDAY: LingoHack THURSDAY: 6 Minute English FRIDAY: The Experiment (watch this space for new and exciting content that we are trying out!) For more videos and content that will help you learn English, visit our website: http://www.bbclearningenglish.com
Views: 151959 BBC Learning English
Michelle Obama and her mission to inspire women: 6 Minute English
 
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Michelle Obama left the White House with her husband, President Barack Obama, in 2016, but she's still very much in the news. In a recent visit to the UK to publicise her autobiography, the former First Lady of the US indicated that her official position may have come to an end, but she continues with her mission to try to inspire girls and women all over the world. Rob and Dan talk about Michelle Obama and teach you new vocabulary. You'll find the transcript and the vocabulary on our website: http://www.bbc.co.uk/learningenglish/english/features/6-minute-english/ep-181227 [Picture: Getty Images] Learn English with our free English videos everyday on BBC Learning English's website and YouTube channel. Learning English is easy - Improve with our free English videos and lessons on grammar, vocabulary, pronunciation and English exams. Please use English when you comment. Visit our website: http://www.bbclearningenglish.com
Views: 111970 BBC Learning English
Is talking on the phone embarrassing? - 6 Minute English
 
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Do you think talking on the telephone is embarrassing? What clues about yourself and your background are you giving away? In what way might people be judging you incorrectly because of your phone conversation? That's what Neil and Sam talk about as they teach you related vocabulary. You'll find the transcript and vocabulary on our website: http://www.bbc.co.uk/learningenglish/english/features/6-minute-english/ep-190613 [Cover: Getty Images] Learning English is easy! Improve your English with our free English videos and lessons on grammar, vocabulary, pronunciation and English exams. We like receiving and reading your comments - please use English when you comment. For more free English lessons and videos visit our website: http://www.bbclearningenglish.com
Views: 32653 BBC Learning English
Pronunciation: Linking /w/
 
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Tim's back in his pronunciation workshop. This time he's looking at an aspect of connected speech called linking /w/. Find out what it is and how to use it - and why Tim needs an ambulance! For more, visit our website: http://www.bbc.co.uk/learningenglish/english/course/towards-advanced/unit-7/session-5 Transcript: Tim Hi, I'm Tim and this is my pronunciation workshop. Here, I'm gonna show you how English is really spoken. It'll help you become a better listener and a more fluent speaker. Come on, let's go inside. When we speak English fluently we sometimes add extra sounds in between the words to help them link together. Now, have a look at my feet. What's wrong with this? Let's ask the people of London: Voxpops The shoe is on the other foot. The shoe is on the wrong foot. The shoe is on the wrong foot. The shoe is on the wrong foot. Tim 'Shoe' ends in the sound /u:/ and 'is' begins with the sound /ɪ/. But can you hear another sound linking them together? Have another listen: Voxpops The shoe is on the other foot. The shoe is on the wrong foot. The shoe is on the wrong foot. The shoe is on the wrong foot. Tim When one word ends in an /u:/ sound and the next begins in a vowel sound we can just about hear another sound in between. This sound is a bit like /w/. So 'The shoe is…' becomes 'The shoewis'. This is called the linking /w/ - but it's important to remember that it's not a full /w/ sound. It happens because the mouth moves from an /u:/ sound to a vowel sound and on the way it passes through the /w/ mouth shape. Here are some more examples: Examples When do I have to be there? I haven't got a clue at all. That glue is really strong. I really can't do it. Tim So, you've heard the examples, and now it's your turn. Are you ready? Listen and repeat. Examples When do I have to be there? I haven't got a clue at all. That glue is really strong. I really can't do it. Tim Well done. Now remember, if you want to learn more about pronunciation, please visit our website, bbclearningenglish.com. And that's about it from the pronunciation workshop this week. See you soon. Bye. Now I really must get this other shoe on, otherwise I'm going to have an accident. Aaah! Too late.
Views: 91720 BBC Learning English
Study Skills – How to think critically
 
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You know how to find sources and include them in your assignments – but do you know how to evaluate their worth critically? This is key for success and will help you become a top-class distance learner. Find out how in this episode of our Study Skills series – part of our 'Go The Distance' course, giving you the skills and knowledge you need to be a top-class distance learner! For more information about academic know-how, English language and study skills for distance learners, visit us at http://www.bbc.co.uk/learningenglish/gothedistance. To find out more about our partner, The Open University, go to http://www.open.edu/openlearn/tv-radio-events/events/go-the-distance.
Views: 70066 BBC Learning English
Exercise helps the brain: BBC News Review
 
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Your brain will work better if you take regular exercise, according to a study. Vocabulary: sharp mentally quick and intelligent keep (something) at bay prevent (something) from happening stints limited periods of time spent doing an activity The story: A study says moderate exercise several times a week is the best way for the over 50s to keep their brains in good working order. Australian researchers say combining aerobic activities, such as swimming, cycling or jogging, with muscle-strengthening exercises is most effective. They support the idea that taking up exercise at any age is worthwhile. Neil and Catherine teach you how to use the language the world's media is using to discuss this story. [Image: GETTY IMAGES] For more, visit our website: http://www.bbc.co.uk/learningenglish/english/course/english-you-need/unit-12/session-2
Views: 804378 BBC Learning English
Having an appraisal? - 40 - English at Work helps you think about your work
 
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For more English at Work and other great content:: http://www.bbc.co.uk/learningenglish/english/features/english-at-work TRANSCRIPT Paul Could I have a word Anna, in my office? Narrator Hello again. I wonder what Paul wants to say to Anna? Could it have something to do with Rachel, the pen thief or is it just to do with biscuits?! Let's find out. Paul Have a seat… so well done for speaking to her. Stealing all those pens from the office was the final straw. Anna She was stealing straws? Paul No, no. It was the final thing that she did wrong – and it meant disciplinary action. I've had to 'let her go' – in other words, sack her. Anna Oh, so she's gone. But what is Mr Socrates going to say? She was his best employee. Paul Leave it with me. I’m sure he'll understand…I hope. Now, I wanted to speak to you about your appraisal. Anna My appraisal? Paul Yes, we do it every year. It's a chance to talk about you, talk about the highs and lows of the past year and look forward. Anna Highs and lows? But I haven't been walking up any hills. Narrator No Anna! He means your appraisal is about reviewing your performance and setting objectives for the year ahead. Anna I see. But what are objectives? Narrator These are tasks for you to do, to try and improve your performance and skills and help the business. Here are the questions you’re likely to hear in an appraisal: What's gone well for you this year? What didn't go so well? What should you do more of? Let's look ahead and set some objectives. Anna Right. Thanks. So Paul, when shall we have this, err, appraisal? Paul If you've time, we could make a start now? Anna Oh OK. So I need to think about my performance first? Paul Exactly. What has gone well for you this year? Anna Well I guess I've just done my job. Narrator Anna! This is your chance to sell yourself. Think about the deals you've made, the people you've managed, that sort of thing. Anna Right. Well, I did complete two big contracts for the Imperial Lemon… Paul You've had plenty of compliments for that. You seem to have a zest for selling! Anna Err, right… and then there was dealing with Mr Ingle in the warehouse. Paul Yes, that's a good example of dealing with difficult staff. And what didn't go so well? Anna Well…erm…working with Rachel…and cold calling I suppose. That wasn’t easy. Paul Ah yes. But you soon warmed up! And what should you do more of? Anna Err, erm… Narrator It's a tricky question Anna – but don't be ashamed about admitting things that you feel you could improve on. Nobody's perfect! Think about skills you'd like to improve. Anna Oh OK. Well Paul, I guess I could….develop some ideas for new products? Continue to work on the European marketing strategy..sell more Imperial Lemons…err… Paul That's enough Anna! If you do all that, you'll put me out of a job! Anna Oh, I don't want to do that! Paul Now let's look ahead and set some objectives. Biscuit? Anna Biscuits as an objective? Oh I see…no thanks. Paul We've all got to improve our sales targets so I'm asking all the team to make an extra ten sales deals this year. Anna Oh, ten, that’s a lot. Paul It is but I know you can do it. And you mentioned developing new products, well I'd like you to do just that – but not plastic fruit, I'd like you to develop a plastic vegetable. Potato, carrot, that sort of thing. Anna Gosh. Well, ok. Paul Oh and one more thing. Could you help Denise sort out the stationery cupboard? It's a right mess. Anna Err. Narrator That's a lot of objectives for Anna. She's got her work cut out for the next year. Appraisals are a good time to review your work and plan what you going to do next. Here's a reminder of the kind of questions your manager may as you: What has gone well for you this year? Give me some examples. What didn't go so well? What should you do more of? Let's look ahead and set some objectives. Paul So if you could write up your appraisal and have it back to me by Friday? Anna Of course Paul. Thanks. See you later. Tom Oh hi Anna. Are you still on for dinner on Friday? Anna Yes Tom! Anna What's going on?! Denise A mouse…a mouse! I've just seen a mouse running out of the stationary office. Tom Was he stealing the pens?! Denise It's no joke. Quick…there he goes! Tom Leave him to me! Oh…oww! Anna Tom…Tom? Are you ok? Find the rest of the transcript on our website
Views: 49369 BBC Learning English
Answering interview questions - 02 - English at Work helps.
 
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Anna's job interview continues. But with all the pressure and stress, she has frozen mid-sentence. This episode helps Anna and you find different ways to answer interview questions. For more: http://www.bbc.co.uk/learningenglish/english/features/english-at-work
Views: 199847 BBC Learning English
Is music getting faster? Listen to 6 Minute English
 
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Music producers are adapting their songs for modern technology. Researchers have found long instrumental introductions to pop songs have become almost extinct. Neil and Rob discuss this new trend and teach you some vocabulary. [Cover: Getty Images] For the transcript and vocabulary, visit our website: http://www.bbc.co.uk/learningenglish/english/features/6-minute-english/ep-190117 Learning English is easy! Improve your English with our free English videos and lessons on grammar, vocabulary, pronunciation and English exams. Please use English when you comment. For more free English lessons and videos visit our website: http://www.bbclearningenglish.com
Views: 106422 BBC Learning English
Describing Generation Z: 6 Minute English
 
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In this programme, we look at Generation Z - a name that describes the people born in the late nineties or early noughties. Also known as Gen Z, they are seen as the social media generation. We discuss other characteristics of this young generation and learn some new vocabulary along the way. This week's question: No one can quite agree on who first used the term 'social media', but we do know from which decade it came. Was it... a) the 1980s b) the 1990s c) the noughties, that is the first decade of the 21st Century. Listen to the programme to find out the answer. Vocabulary generations this is a term used to describe people born in a particular period of time (usually, but not always a period of about 18 to 20 years) noughties first decade of the 21st Century from 2000 to 2009 to cater for to provide something that is needed or wanted for a particular group tech-innate, hyper-informed consumers (here) describes people who are extremely comfortable with modern technology and social media and as a result have a lot of information about what's going on in the world savvy smart and intelligent the norm what is normal, what is usual for someone [Getty Images] You'll find the transcript here: http://www.bbc.co.uk/learningenglish/english/features/6-minute-english/ep-181004 Learn English with BBC Learning English. Every day we help you to learn English with our brilliant mix of grammar, vocabulary, pronunciation, news and inspiring English programmes. We also produce regular 'extra' videos across the week so come back every day to see what's new. Regular content MONDAY: The English We Speak MONDAY: English in a Minute TUESDAY: News Review TUESDAY: English At Work WEDNESDAY: LingoHack THURSDAY: 6 Minute English FRIDAY: Editor's Choice We like receiving and reading your comments - please use English when you comment. For more videos and content that will help you learn English, visit our website: http://www.bbclearningenglish.com
Views: 100117 BBC Learning English
BBC English Masterclass: Giving emphasis
 
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How can you change the structure of a sentence to add emphasis? Find out about cleft sentences in this Masterclass with Sian. For more, visit our website: http://www.bbc.co.uk/learningenglish/english/course/towards-advanced/unit-12/session-1 TRANSCRIPT Sian Hi, Sian here for BBC Learning English. And today we're going to look at ways of giving emphasis. OK, so one way of giving emphasis is by using a cleft sentence. What's that? Well, basically a cleft sentence is a way of cutting a sentence in half so that you can give emphasis to the important or new information. It tells the listener or reader what information they need to pay attention to. Let's have an example: Sian Rob ate my biscuits yesterday. Voice Ah, so Catherine ate your biscuits yesterday. Sian It was Rob that ate my biscuits. Voice I hear Rob ate your lunch. Sian No, it was my biscuits that Rob ate yesterday. Voice I can't believe Rob ate your biscuits this morning. Sian It was yesterday that Rob ate my biscuits. OK, so I said the same sentence in three different ways but each time, the emphasis changed. I did this by using an 'it' cleft. Let's have a look in more detail. So we have it is or it was - so here's our 'it' cleft - followed by the key information we want to emphasise, followed by that and then the rest of the message. So, let's look at the examples we had. Here we want to emphasise Rob. So, "It was Rob that ate my biscuits," not Catherine. Here, because it's a person, we can also use 'who', although 'that' is more common. Now, I want to emphasise that it was biscuits, not lunch. So, "It was my biscuits that Rob ate, not my lunch." Notice this is plural but we still use 'was' not 'were' here. And then finally, I want to emphasise that it was yesterday. So, "It was yesterday that Rob ate my biscuits," not today. Let's look at a few more examples. If we want to talk about the present, we use it is and the verb in the present. So, "It is me that does all the work." We can also put this structure into the question form. So, "Was it you that told him?" And we can make it negative. "It wasn't me that told him." This last sentence, we could also use 'I' instead of 'me', but this is much more formal. So, "It wasn't I who told him." So, that was your introduction to the 'it' cleft. Now, these structures are really useful in writing because when we're writing, we can't stress or give intonation, so it helps to emphasise key information. They're also common when we're speaking. But you have to remember to stress the key information. So, for example, "It was his smile that I first noticed." Or, "It was only a year ago that we met." Now, it's practice that you really need. So, go to our website - bbclearningenglish.com - for more information and to practise these structures. Goodbye!
Views: 49144 BBC Learning English
Lie vs Lay - English In A Minute
 
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'Lay' and 'lie' are easy words to confuse! Learn the difference with English In A Minute! Sian's going to show you the differences between lay and lie! Watch the video then answer the question! Is this sentence correct? If not, can you fix it? ‘I like to lay on the beach and read a book.’ ☺️Visit our website for the transcript, a summary and more quizzes: http://www.bbc.co.uk/learningenglish/english/course/eiam/unit-1/session-33 Learn English with BBC Learning English. Every day we help you to learn English with our brilliant mix of grammar, vocabulary, pronunciation, news and inspiring English programmes. We also produce regular 'extra' videos across the week so come back every day to see what's new. Regular content MONDAY: The English We Speak MONDAY: English in a Minute TUESDAY: News Review WEDNESDAY: LingoHack THURSDAY: 6 Minute English FRIDAY: Editor's Choice Please use English when you comment. For more videos and content that will help you learn English, visit our website: http://www.bbclearningenglish.com ( 🤫 About the sentence: it’s not correct. Here you need the verb ‘lie’. The correct sentence is: ‘I like to lie on the beach and read a book.’)
Views: 52063 BBC Learning English
Learn to talk about sugar in 6 minutes
 
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[Images: GETTY IMAGES] Do you really know how much of the sweet stuff you eat? Neil and Rob talk about sugar and teach you some tempting new vocabulary. This week's question: If a food contains 5% total sugars per 100g, is it… a) high in sugar b) low in sugar or c) somewhere in the middle? Listen to the programme to find out the answer. Vocabulary: have a sweet tooth like sugary things processed food any food that has been changed in some way by freezing it, putting it in tins, combining foods or adding chemicals at a glance with a quick look fat-free without any fat in it avoid something at all costs do everything you can to avoid it demonise make someone or something seem very bad Do you want to learn how to speak English? Then join us here on YouTube for great grammar, drama, news, study, pronunciation, vocabulary, music, interviews and celebrity videos. Every day we have a new video to help you with English. We also produce regular 'extra' videos across the week so come back every day to see what's new. MONDAY: The English We Speak TUESDAY: News Review TUESDAY: English At Work WEDNESDAY: LingoHack THURSDAY: 6 Minute English FRIDAY: The Experiment (watch this space for new and exciting content that we are trying out!) For more videos and content that will help you learn English, visit our website: http://www.bbclearningenglish.com
Views: 106229 BBC Learning English
Pronunciation: The intrusive /r/
 
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Tim's hard at work in the pronunciation workshop. This time, he's talking about sounds that you can hear, even when they don't - or shouldn't - exist! For more, visit our website: http://www.bbc.co.uk/learningenglish/english/course/towards-advanced/unit-5/session-5 Transcript: Tim Hi, I'm Tim and this is my pronunciation workshop. Here I'm gonna show you how English is really spoken. It'll help you become a better listener and a more fluent speaker. Come on, let's go inside. Have you ever seen a ghost? No, of course you haven't, because they don't exist. But have you ever heard a sound that wasn't there? Well, if you've listened to lots of real English, you probably have. We asked the people of London what they think is the most important thing the government should prioritise. This is what they said: Voxpops I think law and order is important. Yes, I think law and order is important. Law and order is very important. We all think that law and order is important. I think law and order is very important. Tim Meet my boys. 'Law' and 'order'. Join them together with the word 'and' and you can hear another sound after the word 'law'. Listen out for it. Voxpops I think law and order is important. Yes, I think law and order is important. Law and order is very important. We all think that law and order is important. I think law and order is very important. Tim In fluent speech, if a word ends in an /ɔː/ sound, like law and the next word begins in an /ə/, you'll often hear a /r/ sound linking them together. Law-r-and order. Law-r-and order. 'Law-r-and order' is easier to say than 'law and order'. It flows better. And this is called intrusion. Now this is a little bit controversial. It doesn't happen in all accents and some people do say it's not the proper way to speak. But it is something you will hear. Just remember the /r/ sound is not very strong. Here are some other examples: Examples Can you draw a circle freehand? My dog hurt its paw on some broken glass. There was a flaw in the argument. I saw a good film last night. Tim Right, so you've heard the examples, now it's your turn. Are you ready to give it a try? Listen and repeat. Examples Can you draw a circle freehand? My dog hurt its paw on some broken glass. There was a flaw in the argument. I saw a good film last night. Tim How did you do? Well done. Now, if you want to read more about this topic, please visit our website bbclearningenglish.com. That's it from the pronunciation workshop for this week. Bye. Now, do you want a war or what? Ow!
Views: 132094 BBC Learning English
Vocabulary: How to use linking words to connect ideas in English
 
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Discourse markers are words and phrases we use to connect and organise our ideas. They act like signposts, telling the listener what information is coming up next. Sian will share eight discourse markers with you – and she'll let you listen to her telephone conversation to do this! For more, visit our website: http://www.bbc.co.uk/learningenglish/english/course/towards-advanced/unit-16/session-1 Transcript: Hi Sian here for BBC Learning English. There are signposts everywhere - today in this Masterclass we're going to look at ways you can use signposting when you're speaking. So, there are signposts everywhere and they tell us where to go, but did you know that when we're speaking we use signpost words and phrases to help direct the listener? These are called discourse markers. They help connect what we're saying and tell the listener what information is coming up. They'll help you sound more fluent and help you understand native speaker conversations. Listen to my telephone call this morning. I use eight different discourse markers – can you hear all eight...? ...You know I was hosting an amazing dinner party last night? Actually, it was a complete disaster - I burnt the meat… people arrived when I was still cooking. Mind you, I did say 'turn up when you want'… and I did start cooking pretty late! Anyway, as I was saying, I burnt the meat, the dishes were all ready at different times... the dessert was… oh come to think of it, I completely forgot to serve dessert! So basically, everyone went home hungry. Anyway, how was your evening? By the way, before I forget, it's my birthday next week and I'm having a dinner party do you want to come? So the first discourse marker I used was you know, we use this to say: 'I'm going to tell you some information that you already know.' ''You know I was hosting an amazing dinner party last night?'' The second one I used was actually - we use this when we're about to give some surprising information or correct some information. "Actually, it was a complete disaster". Then I used mind you - we use this when we're about to give an afterthought that contrasts the information that came before, so, "people arrived when I was still cooking. Mind you, I did say 'turn up when you want'..." The next discourse marker I used was anyway, as I was saying. As I was saying is very useful because it means: 'I'm going to return to what I was talking about before'. So, "as I was saying, I burnt the meat" This is a previous topic. Then I used the discourse marker come to think of it, we use this when you've just remembered or thought of something as you're speaking "oh come to think of it, I completely forgot to serve dessert!" I'm remembering this as I'm speaking. Then I used basically - basically is used to summarise what you're going to say. "So basically, everyone went home hungry". The next one I used was anyway - anyway is really useful and very common. We use it to say 'I'm going to change topic now' or 'I'm going to go back to the original topic' or 'I'm going to finish what I was talking about'. "Anyway, how was your evening?" And the final one I used was by the way - we use this to say 'I'm going to change direction and talk about something that's not connected to the main topic. "By the way, before I forget, it's my birthday next week." So basically that's your introduction to discourse markers. We use them all the time, when we're speaking... and come to think of it, when we're writing too. By the way, we have a website bbclearningenglish.com where you can practise these and find out more information. Anyway see you soon. Goodbye.
Views: 178771 BBC Learning English
The rise in popularity of the comfy shoe - 6 Minute English
 
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Despite what Neil's been told, comfortable shoes, such as trainers, are considered more acceptable these days than ever before. This is because more and more people are wearing them. But what has caused this rise in popularity? Has it happened suddenly, or over time? And is Neil wearing high heels? Find out and everything and learn the related vocabulary. You'll find the transcript and the vocabulary on our website: http://www.bbc.co.uk/learningenglish/english/features/6-minute-english/ep-190425 [Cover: Getty Images] Learning English is easy! Improve your English with our free English videos and lessons on grammar, vocabulary, pronunciation and English exams. Please use English when you comment. For more free English lessons and videos visit our website: http://www.bbclearningenglish.com
Views: 54368 BBC Learning English
Give someone the runaround: What does it mean? The English We Speak
 
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Rob's desperate to get a place to run in the marathon but he keeps being given the runaround. Surely running is a good thing? But as he's about to explain to Feifei, this expression has nothing to do with exercise – it's just frustrating! Find out more in this episode of The English We Speak. [Images: Getty Images] You'll find the transcript on our website: http://www.bbc.co.uk/learningenglish/english/features/the-english-we-speak/ep-190415http://www.bbc.co.uk/learningenglish/english/features/the-english-we-speak/ep-190415 Learning English is easy! Improve your English with our free English videos and lessons on grammar, vocabulary, pronunciation and English exams. Please use English when you comment. For more free English lessons and videos visit our website: http://www.bbclearningenglish.com
Views: 30432 BBC Learning English