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BBC Learning English: Video Words in the News: The oldest person to climb Everest (29th May 2013)
 
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Watch our weekly news video. This week's video is: Oldest Everest climber. Meet the Japanese man who is the oldest person ever to have reached the top of Everest, 60 years after it was first climbed.
Views: 137090 BBC Learning English
Why do young people feel so lonely? Listen to 6 Minute English
 
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Visit our website: http://www.bbclearningenglish.com We all live in an over-crowded world which is fast approaching eight billion people. Despite that many individuals feel alone and isolated. The BBC made a survey about loneliness, involving 55,000 people from almost 240 different countries. Neil and Sam discuss the findings and teach you new vocabulary. Vocabulary isolated far away from other places and people stereotype the noun for a simplistic view of person or group based on certain characteristics such as their nationality, age, profession and the like intensely strongly plagued by something it causes you problems and difficulties figure something out trying to understand something to regulate to control You'll find the transcript here: http://www.bbc.co.uk/learningenglish/english/features/6-minute-english/ep-181108 [Cover: Getty Images] Learn English with BBC Learning English. Every day we help you to learn English with our brilliant mix of grammar, vocabulary, pronunciation, news and inspiring English programmes. We also produce regular 'extra' videos across the week so come back every day to see what's new. Regular content MONDAY: The English We Speak MONDAY: English in a Minute TUESDAY: News Review WEDNESDAY: LingoHack THURSDAY: 6 Minute English FRIDAY: Editor's Choice Please use English when you comment. For more videos and content that will help you learn English, visit our website: http://www.bbclearningenglish.com
Views: 315871 BBC Learning English
Improving your memory: 6 Minute English
 
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Storing information is an important function of our brains and scientists are always looking at ways to improve it but also to stop it deteriorating. Neil and Rob discuss ways of improving your memory and teach you new vocabulary - that they hope you'll remember later! You'll find the transcript and vocabulary on our website: http://www.bbc.co.uk/learningenglish/english/features/6-minute-english/ep-190131 [Image: Getty Images] Learning English is easy! Improve your English with our free English videos and lessons on grammar, vocabulary, pronunciation and English exams. Please use English when you comment. For more free English lessons and videos visit our website: http://www.bbclearningenglish.com
Views: 218782 BBC Learning English
Short Vowel. Pronunciation Tips.
 
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Learn English and improve your pronunciation with our series of 44 videos designed to help improve your pronunciation and English.
Views: 1613716 BBC Learning English
What makes you happy? Listen to 6 Minute English
 
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Research has suggested that while personal feelings of pleasure are the accepted definition of happiness in Western cultures, East Asian cultures tend to see happiness as social harmony and in some parts of Africa and India it's more about shared experiences and family. Neil and Rob discuss what makes people happy and ... are happy to teach you new vocabulary. You'll find the transcript here: http://www.bbc.co.uk/learningenglish/english/features/6-minute-english/ep-190124 [Image: Getty Images] Learning English is easy! Improve your English with our free English videos and lessons on grammar, vocabulary, pronunciation and English exams. Please use English when you comment. For more free English lessons and videos visit our website: http://www.bbclearningenglish.com
Views: 153845 BBC Learning English
The smell of coffee: 6 Minute English
 
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Is there more to coffee than just drinking it? Experts say that the smell of the beans is just as important. Neil and Catherine discuss the science behind why coffee often smells better than it tastes and teach some new vocabulary along the way. Vocabulary vital very important key essential, necessary a physiological response a reaction your body has to something, like a smell to be baffled by something to be confused by something, to not understand it a chain a group of shops from the same company, all the shops have the same design and sell the same or very similar products weird unusual, strange Download the audio and a transcript here http://www.bbc.co.uk/learningenglish/english/features/6-minute-english/ep-181122 Learn English with BBC Learning English. Every day we help you to learn English with our brilliant mix of grammar, vocabulary, pronunciation, news and inspiring English programmes. We also produce regular 'extra' videos across the week so come back every day to see what's new. Regular content MONDAY: The English We Speak MONDAY: English in a Minute TUESDAY: News Review TUESDAY: English At Work WEDNESDAY: LingoHack THURSDAY: 6 Minute English FRIDAY: Editor's Choice We like receiving and reading your comments - please use English when you comment. For more videos and content that will help you learn English, visit our website: http://www.bbclearningenglish.com
Views: 204902 BBC Learning English
Would you eat less meat to save the environment? Listen to 6 Minute English
 
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Could you eat less meat and adopt a diet based on vegetables and fruit to help save the environment? Neil and Catherine talk about a new diet, known as flexitarianism, and teach you new vocabulary. You'll find the transcript and vocabulary on our website: http://www.bbc.co.uk/learningenglish/english/features/6-minute-english/ep-190103 [Cover: Getty Images] Learning English is easy! Improve your English with our free English videos and lessons on grammar, vocabulary, pronunciation and English exams. Please use English when you comment. For more free English lessons and videos visit our website: http://www.bbclearningenglish.com
Views: 110756 BBC Learning English
What's on your 'to-do' list? Add listening to 6 Minute English to it
 
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Pay bills, clean the house... these are boring tasks we all have to do regularly even if we don't feel like it. They're part of what we call 'life admin'. Neil and Rob discuss what could make life admin tasks more interesting and teach you related vocabulary. You'll find the transcript and vocabulary on our website: http://www.bbc.co.uk/learningenglish/english/features/6-minute-english/ep-190307 [Cover: Getty Images] Learning English is easy! Improve your English with our free English videos and lessons on grammar, vocabulary, pronunciation and English exams. Please use English when you comment. For more free English lessons and videos visit our website: http://www.bbclearningenglish.com
Views: 80777 BBC Learning English
How to prepare for an interview - 01 - English at Work has the answers
 
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Anna has an interview at Tip Top Trading. This episode helps her and you prepare for an interview by providing answers to interview questions. English at work helps you learn the language you need to get a job and to work in an office environment. For more: http://www.bbc.co.uk/learningenglish/english/features/english-at-work
Views: 331074 BBC Learning English
Debating veganism: How to change someone's opinion - 6 Minute English
 
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Veganism is a controversial issue with strong opinions in favour and against. However, these opinion are less based on facts than you might think. What are they based on then, and how can we convince someone to change an opinion? Dan and Rob find out and teach you new vocabulary. You'll find the transcript and vocabulary on our website: http://www.bbc.co.uk/learningenglish/english/features/6-minute-english/ep-190314 [Image: Getty Images] Learning English is easy! Improve your English with our free English videos and lessons on grammar, vocabulary, pronunciation and English exams. Please use English when you comment. For more free English lessons and videos visit our website: http://www.bbclearningenglish.com
Views: 82277 BBC Learning English
How your eyes predict your personality - 6 Minute English
 
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Watch where you're watching! Apparently, where your eyes look can be used to predict things about your personality. Could this be the personality test of the future? Neil and Rob discuss how your eyes predict your personality and teach you related vocabulary. You'll find the transcript and the vocabulary on our website: http://www.bbc.co.uk/learningenglish/english/features/6-minute-english/ep-190321 [Cover: Getty Images] Learning English is easy! Improve your English with our free English videos and lessons on grammar, vocabulary, pronunciation and English exams. Please use English when you comment. For more free English lessons and videos visit our website: http://www.bbclearningenglish.com
Views: 73258 BBC Learning English
Are food allergies more common now? 6 Minute English
 
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Research has suggested that food allergies may be more common these days than they were in the last 20 or 30 years. Why might this be? Is it linked to our diet? And are there any signs that a child might go on to develop a food allergy as an adult? Neil and Rob discuss if food allergies are becoming more common, and teach you new vocabulary. [Cover: Getty Images] For the transcript and vocabulary, visit our website: http://www.bbc.co.uk/learningenglish/english/features/6-minute-english/ep-190221 Learning English is easy! Improve your English with our free English videos and lessons on grammar, vocabulary, pronunciation and English exams. Please use English when you comment. For more free English lessons and videos visit our website: http://www.bbclearningenglish.com
Views: 71981 BBC Learning English
Do you have a second job? Listen to 6 Minute English
 
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A quarter of workers in the UK are thought to have a side hustle. It seems that more and more people want to put their skills and passions into practice to make extra money. These tend to be entrepreneurial young people who want to work on their own projects alongside their main source of income. Are you one of them? Neil and Rob discuss side hustles and teach you related vocabulary. You'll find the transcript and vocabulary on our website: http://www.bbc.co.uk/learningenglish/english/features/6-minute-english/ep-190328 Learning English is easy! Improve your English with our free English videos and lessons on grammar, vocabulary, pronunciation and English exams. Please use English when you comment. For more free English lessons and videos visit our website: http://www.bbclearningenglish.com
Views: 85957 BBC Learning English
Are dating apps effective? Listen to 6 Minute English
 
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Research shows that fewer than 5% of people who have used dating apps, actually go out on a date with someone they met through them. Neil and Dan discuss the reasons for it and teach you related vocabulary. You'll find the transcript on our website: http://www.bbc.co.uk/learningenglish/english/features/6-minute-english/ep-190214 [Cover: Getty Images] Learning English is easy! Improve your English with our free English videos and lessons on grammar, vocabulary, pronunciation and English exams. Please use English when you comment. For more free English lessons and videos visit our website: http://www.bbclearningenglish.com
Views: 60818 BBC Learning English
Street food: Why is it becoming popular?
 
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Buying food on the street is nothing new but in the UK this idea is really taking off. It's a great way of sampling freshly cooked dishes from around the world. Rob and Neil discuss the subject and hear from an expert who explains the popularity in this type of food - plus you can learn some new vocabulary along the way. Listen to a discussion about street food and learn new items of vocabulary in just 6 minutes! To download the audio and transcript, go to http://www.bbc.co.uk/learningenglish/english/features/6-minute-english/ep-180830 [Cover: GETTY IMAGES] Do you want to learn how to speak English? Then join us here on YouTube for great grammar, drama, news, study, pronunciation, vocabulary, music, interviews and celebrity videos. Every day we have a new video to help you with English. We also produce regular 'extra' videos across the week so come back every day to see what's new. MONDAY: The English We Speak TUESDAY: News Review WEDNESDAY: LingoHack THURSDAY: 6 Minute English FRIDAY: The Experiment (watch this space for new and exciting content that we are trying out!) Please use English when you comment. For more videos and content that will help you learn English, visit our website: http://www.bbclearningenglish.com
Views: 145181 BBC Learning English
Pronunciation: The words 'was' and 'were'
 
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Tim's back in his Pronunciation Workshop. This time he's finding out how English speakers sometimes pronounce the words 'was' and 'were' - even though he's a bit tired. For more, visit our website: http://www.bbc.co.uk/learningenglish/english/course/towards-advanced/unit-13/session-5 Transcript: Tim Hi. I'm Tim and this is my Pronunciation Workshop. Here, I'm going to show you how English is really spoken. Come on, let's go inside. Oh dear, excuse me. I’m a bit tired: I was out late last night, with the lads. I know, yeah, we didn't get back until 9.30. In the evening. It was a wild night. I know, I know, I am a party animal. Anyway, while I get myself together a bit, let's ask some other people in London what they got up to last night. Voxpops At 9 o'clock last night I was watching a movie. I was laying in bed. I was invited to a dinner at my friend's house. I was playing football I was out drinking. Tim Well well, what interesting lives we all lead. Now they all used the past form of the verb 'to be' – was. Now the word was is made of the sounds /w/, /ɔ:/, / z/, isn’t it? Or is it? Listen again. What sound can you actually hear? Voxpops At 9 o'clock last night I was watching a movie. I was laying in bed. I was invited to a dinner at my friend's house. I was playing football I was out drinking. Tim When the word was is unstressed, as in the examples we’ve just heard, then the vowel sound changes to a schwa - /ə/. So was becomes /wəz/, and also were becomes /wə/. These are called weak forms. Here are some more examples. Examples I was there when it happened. We were delighted with the results. We were having a good time until it rained. He was feeling much better last night. Tim Right, now you've heard the examples, and now it's your turn. Listen and repeat. Examples I was there when it happened. We were delighted with the results. We were having a good time until it rained. He was feeling much better last night. Tim Great work. Remember, if you want to learn more about pronunciation, then please visit our website, bbclearningenglish dot com. And that is about it from the Pronunciation Workshop for now. I'll see you soon. Bye bye! Now… oh look! Hey, you know what this is? This is WAS backwards. Get it? WAS backwards… it's a SAW. Now, I know what you were thinking. You were thinking that I was going to have some terrible accident. Well don’t worry – it’s not even switched on – look! Wooahhhhh!!!
Views: 389651 BBC Learning English
How creative should we be? Listen to 6 Minute English
 
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The World Economic Forum forecasts that by 2020, creativity will be in the top three most important skills for future jobs. This is particularly relevant for younger people who will be entering the world of work soon. BBC Learning English's very creative scriptwriter Rob and Neil discuss what it takes to be creative - and they also teach you related vocabulary. Vocabulary a creative (noun) a person whose job is to use a lot of imagination and come up with new ideas, such as someone who works in the media or advertising legitimately describes doing something fairly and reasonably think outside the box find new ways of doing things redress the balance to make things fairer and more equal lifeblood the most important thing to make something a success disparate very different and unrelated headspace when your mind is in a good state and you can think clearly You'll find the transcript here: http://www.bbc.co.uk/learningenglish/english/features/6-minute-english/ep-181025 [Cover: Getty Images] Learn English with BBC Learning English. Every day we help you to learn English with our brilliant mix of grammar, vocabulary, pronunciation, news and inspiring English programmes. We also produce regular 'extra' videos across the week so come back every day to see what's new. Regular content MONDAY: The English We Speak MONDAY: English in a Minute TUESDAY: News Review WEDNESDAY: LingoHack THURSDAY: 6 Minute English FRIDAY: Editor's Choice Please use English when you comment. For more videos and content that will help you learn English, visit our website: http://www.bbclearningenglish.com
Views: 105583 BBC Learning English
Why do we feel awkward? - 6 Minute English
 
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We all know the feeling. That horrible uncomfortable silence where we freeze up, or look away or just want to turn invisible. Awkwardness can strike anyone in the wrong circumstances. But why does it happen? How is it connected to rules and what does it have to do with society? Neil and Dan find out and teach you related vocabulary. You'll find the transcript and the vocabulary on our website: http://www.bbc.co.uk/learningenglish/english/features/6-minute-english/ep-190404 [Cover: Getty Images] Learning English is easy! Improve your English with our free English videos and lessons on grammar, vocabulary, pronunciation and English exams. Please use English when you comment. For more free English lessons and videos visit our website: http://www.bbclearningenglish.com
Views: 76269 BBC Learning English
Why do men want to be fathers? Watch 6 Minute English
 
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Why do men want to have children? Evolutionary anthropologist Anna Machin wrote a book about it and tries to answer this question. Catherine and Neil - a father himself - discuss her theories and teach you six items of related vocabulary. Vocabulary: admit to something say something is true, even if it might make you look a little bit bad to be keen on something to be very interested in and enthusiastic about something going along with something agreeing to do something even though you don't really want to do it an absent father a father who is not at home to spend time with his children disciplinarians people who have strict rules and they give out punishments when these rules aren't followed to be hands-on to be very much involved in something You'll find the transcript here: http://www.bbc.co.uk/learningenglish/english/features/6-minute-english/ep-180816 [Image: GETTY IMAGES] Do you want to learn how to speak English? Then join us here on YouTube for great grammar, drama, news, study, pronunciation, vocabulary, music, interviews and celebrity videos. Every day we have a new video to help you with English. We also produce regular 'extra' videos across the week so come back every day to see what's new. MONDAY: The English We Speak TUESDAY: News Review WEDNESDAY: LingoHack THURSDAY: 6 Minute English FRIDAY: The Experiment (watch this space for new and exciting content that we are trying out!) Please use English when you comment. For more videos and content that will help you learn English, visit our website: http://www.bbclearningenglish.com
Views: 123686 BBC Learning English
Short Vowel. Pronunciation Tips.
 
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Learn English and improve your pronunciation with our series of 44 videos designed to help improve your pronunciation and English.
Views: 567394 BBC Learning English
BBC English Masterclass: Mixing conditionals
 
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You all know about the first, second and third conditionals, but do you know how to mix them? Dan has a lesson which will show you how. For more, visit our website: http://www.bbc.co.uk/learningenglish/english/course/towards-advanced/unit-7/session-1 Transcript: Dan Hi guys. Dan from BBC Learning English here. In this session we'll be looking at mixed conditionals. Now, I know that clever students like yourselves will know that English has three types of conditional sentences. First conditional is to talk about real, present or future situations, second conditional is to talk about hypothetical present or future situations and third conditional is to talk about hypothetical past situations. All three types of conditional are fantastic and all three types of conditional talk about events within their own time frame – present, future and past. But what about if you want to talk about an event that happened in the past - which affects the future? Can events in the present or the future affect the past? Come over here and let's take a look. Here is a third conditional sentence: If I had taken programming at school, I would have got a job at Google years ago. Here we have a past hypothetical with a past consequence. Notice the formula: 'If' plus the past perfect here, 'would' plus have plus the past participle here. Now watch what happens as we change the consequence. If I had taken programming at school, I would be working for Google. Now we have a past hypothetical with a present consequence. This part here is from a second conditional. Its formula is 'would' plus the bare infinitive. This kind of makes sense in that decisions or actions in the past affect the present. But can we do the future? Well, let's have a look. If I had taken programming at school, I would be attending the Google conference next week. Yes we can. As you can see, the only difference between the present and the future is the time expression. The formula is exactly the same: 'would' plus the infinitive. Second conditional. Did you get it? Now let's see what happens if we try to make the second – which is the present – affect the past, which is a third. If I were smarter, I would have invented something clever when I was younger. It can. Now we have a present theory with a past result. This can be a little difficult to understand, until we realise that 'if I were smarter' is the same as saying 'I am not smart' - which is present simple. And remember that we use present simple for long term truth. When I say 'I am not smart', I mean: I am not smart now, in the future and in the past. It's the same as saying 'I am English' - past, present and future. So, this kind of conditional works very well with personal descriptions. And here are a couple of other examples. If he were taller, he would have become a basketball player. If they were in love, they would have got married 10 years ago. If I were less interesting, I wouldn't have been asked to speak in public so many times. Did you get it? Good. Let's try one more. Present to past. But a little bit more specific this time. If I weren't flying on holiday next week, I would have accepted that new project at work. Here we have a present second, although it's actually future, with a past third result. This means that the person couldn't accept the project at work because they knew that they would be flying in the future. OK guys, did you get it? Mixing conditionals isn't difficult to do, as long as you both have confidence and an understanding of the verb forms. It's much easier to do a third to second than it is to do a second to third, but both are possible. And finally, don't forget the importance of time words. OK? Alright. Now, for more information have a look at bbclearningenglish.com. I've been Dan, you've been great. Have fun guys, see you next time.
Views: 56793 BBC Learning English
Tim's top tips for progressing to advanced English - Stop Saying!
 
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Learning English can be hard work. Progress can seem particularly slow when your level gets higher. What can you do to move from intermediate to advanced? Tim has some tips in the last episode of Stop Saying. For more, visit our website:http://www.bbc.co.uk/learningenglish/english/course/upper-intermediate/unit-30/session-4
Views: 99544 BBC Learning English
Pronunciation: Assimilation of /t/ and /p/
 
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What happens when a word ending with a /t/ sound is followed by a word beginning with a /p/ sound? Tim looks at assimilation, with the help of the Learning English team, some Londoners - and a white piece of paper! You can learn more here http://www.bbc.co.uk/learningenglish/english/course/towards-advanced/unit-1/session-5
Views: 173405 BBC Learning English
Learn different ways of talking about the future - Stop Saying
 
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http://www.bbclearningenglish.com When we think of the future, if we're thinking grammatically, we think of will. However, the future can be different depending on what we're talking about. Will is not the only future, as Tim explores in this video. Learn more here http://www.bbc.co.uk/learningenglish/english/course/upper-intermediate/unit-24/session-4
Views: 81854 BBC Learning English
Is music getting faster? Listen to 6 Minute English
 
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Music producers are adapting their songs for modern technology. Researchers have found long instrumental introductions to pop songs have become almost extinct. Neil and Rob discuss this new trend and teach you some vocabulary. [Cover: Getty Images] For the transcript and vocabulary, visit our website: http://www.bbc.co.uk/learningenglish/english/features/6-minute-english/ep-190117 Learning English is easy! Improve your English with our free English videos and lessons on grammar, vocabulary, pronunciation and English exams. Please use English when you comment. For more free English lessons and videos visit our website: http://www.bbclearningenglish.com
Views: 93965 BBC Learning English
The decluttering trend - How do I declutter? 6 Minute English
 
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In many consumer societies these days, people tend to buy and keep lots of things - after all, these things are cheap! But what happens when all of the things we buy become too much? What do we do with all the stuff? Recently, people have been trying to find ways to reduce the amount of stuff that they own. Rob and Neil find out all about the latest decluttering trend, how to do it and why in this 6 Minute English! You'll find the transcript and the vocabulary on our website: http://www.bbc.co.uk/learningenglish/english/features/6-minute-english/ep-190411 [Cover: Getty Images] Learning English is easy! Improve your English with our free English videos and lessons on grammar, vocabulary, pronunciation and English exams. Please use English when you comment. For more free English lessons and videos visit our website: http://www.bbclearningenglish.com
Views: 36625 BBC Learning English
Speaking: Being polite - how to soften your English
 
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Improve your English speaking by learning how to be more polite. Sian's going to show you 4 ways not to offend people by being too direct. For downloadable grammar notes and a 'polite English' quiz, visit our website: http://www.bbc.co.uk/learningenglish/english/course/towards-advanced/unit-24/session-1 TRANSCRIPT Sian Hi Sian here for BBC Learning English… in this Masterclass we're going to look at something British people love doing! Being polite. No, I'm not coming to your party this evening. Wow, this food is disgusting! Give me some of your lunch. Now sometimes it’s ok to be direct – or even blunt with your friends…but it's important not to sound rude, particularly in the workplace. We're going to look at 4 ways you can soften your language to make you more polite… 1: Requests, suggestions and questions. OK, listen to these two requests. Which one sounds more polite and less direct, and why? Number 1: ‘Pick me up on your way to the party this evening!’ Or number 2: ‘I was hoping you could give me a lift to the party.’ Now, number 2 is much more polite. We soften requests, and suggestions and questions by using past forms, continuous forms or both. For example, ‘I was wondering if you could give me a lift later.’ We can also make requests softer by using a negative question with a question tag. So, ‘You couldn’t give me a lift later, could you?’ or ‘I don’t suppose you could pick me up tonight, could you?’ 2: Giving opinions OK, listen to these two opinions. Which do you think sounds less direct and more polite? Number 1: You're too young to get married! Or number 2: I reckon you're a little young to be getting married! Yeah, the second one is much less direct. It’s softer. We use verbs like reckon, guess, feel to make your opinions less direct. You can also use vague expressions like ‘sort of’, ‘kind of’, ‘a little bit’. It also helps if you make it into a question: ‘Aren’t you kind of young to be getting married?’ 3: Discussing problems Ok now listen to these two problems. Which one sounds less direct? The first one: ‘You've made a mistake in this report!’ Or the second one: ‘You seem to have made a mistake here.’ Yes, the second one was softer, less direct. We introduce problems with verbs like seem and appear to soften them. So, ‘You appear to have saved over all my documents’. You can also use these to introduce your own problems. So, ‘I seem to have lost those reports you wanted’. 4: Saying no! Now listen to these two ways of refusing an invitation. Which one sounds less direct? Number 1? ‘No, I'm not coming to your party this evening.’ or number 2? ‘I’m not sure I'll be able to make it to your party this evening.’ Ok, again the second one was much softer, less direct. We find it really hard to say no! So instead we use tentative language to soften it. So, ‘I’m not sure I’ll make it to your party.’ Or ‘It’s looking unlikely I’ll be able to come this evening.’ This basically means ‘I’m not coming!’ Now to find out more about avoiding being too direct, and to practise not being rude, I was hoping you would check out our website bbclearningenglish.com. See you soon, goodbye!
Views: 377235 BBC Learning English
The teenage brain: 6 Minute English
 
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Introduction: Until recently, it was thought that human brain development was all over by early childhood but research in the last decade has shown that the adolescent brain is still changing into early adulthood. This programme delves inside the teenage brain, hears from an expert and teaches some useful vocabulary along the way to stretch your own brain! This week's question There have always been teenagers, but when was the word ‘teenager’ first used to refer to the 13 – 19 age group? Was it: a) the 1920s b) the 1930s c) the 1950s Listen to the programme to find out the answer. Vocabulary adolescence the period in someone’s life when they are developing from a child to an adult papers published scientific research dogma a set of beliefs that are strongly held and which are not challenged prefrontal cortex an important part of the brain involved in many complex mental actions like planning and personality cognitive tasks mental activities that we consciously have to think about like making plans and taking decisions adolescent the adjective to describe behaviour of someone who is in adolescence. Also, the noun for someone who is in adolescence Do download a transcript and the audio, visit our website http://www.bbc.co.uk/learningenglish/english/features/6-minute-english/ep-181213 Learn English with BBC Learning English. Every day we help you to learn English with our brilliant mix of grammar, vocabulary, pronunciation, news and inspiring English programmes. We also produce regular 'extra' videos across the week so come back every day to see what's new. Regular content MONDAY: The English We Speak MONDAY: English in a Minute TUESDAY: News Review TUESDAY: English At Work WEDNESDAY: LingoHack THURSDAY: 6 Minute English FRIDAY: Editor's Choice We like receiving and reading your comments - please use English when you comment. For more videos and content that will help you learn English, visit our website: http://www.bbclearningenglish.com
Views: 121157 BBC Learning English
Are there benefits to schadenfreude? Listen to 6 Minute English
 
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You'll find the transcript and vocabulary on our website: http://www.bbc.co.uk/learningenglish/english/features/6-minute-english/ep-190110 Do you take pleasure when someone undeserving of their success have a spot of bad luck? Not even a little pleasure? Well, if you do (like, apparently, most of us) you might like to learn the word 'schadenfreude' and the concept behind it. Rob and Neil talk about this German word also used in English and teach you new vocabulary. [Image: Getty Images] Learning English is easy! Improve your English with our free videos and lessons on grammar, vocabulary, pronunciation and English exams. Please use English when you comment. For more free English lessons and videos visit our website: http://www.bbclearningenglish.com
Views: 74041 BBC Learning English
Describing Generation Z: 6 Minute English
 
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In this programme, we look at Generation Z - a name that describes the people born in the late nineties or early noughties. Also known as Gen Z, they are seen as the social media generation. We discuss other characteristics of this young generation and learn some new vocabulary along the way. This week's question: No one can quite agree on who first used the term 'social media', but we do know from which decade it came. Was it... a) the 1980s b) the 1990s c) the noughties, that is the first decade of the 21st Century. Listen to the programme to find out the answer. Vocabulary generations this is a term used to describe people born in a particular period of time (usually, but not always a period of about 18 to 20 years) noughties first decade of the 21st Century from 2000 to 2009 to cater for to provide something that is needed or wanted for a particular group tech-innate, hyper-informed consumers (here) describes people who are extremely comfortable with modern technology and social media and as a result have a lot of information about what's going on in the world savvy smart and intelligent the norm what is normal, what is usual for someone [Getty Images] You'll find the transcript here: http://www.bbc.co.uk/learningenglish/english/features/6-minute-english/ep-181004 Learn English with BBC Learning English. Every day we help you to learn English with our brilliant mix of grammar, vocabulary, pronunciation, news and inspiring English programmes. We also produce regular 'extra' videos across the week so come back every day to see what's new. Regular content MONDAY: The English We Speak MONDAY: English in a Minute TUESDAY: News Review TUESDAY: English At Work WEDNESDAY: LingoHack THURSDAY: 6 Minute English FRIDAY: Editor's Choice We like receiving and reading your comments - please use English when you comment. For more videos and content that will help you learn English, visit our website: http://www.bbclearningenglish.com
Views: 93923 BBC Learning English
Learn to talk about exercise in 6 minutes
 
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[Images: GETTY IMAGES] How many steps do you walk a day? Do you know the more the better for your health. Neil and Rob talk about the need to exercise and teach you some related vocabulary. This week's question: How many people aged between 40 and 60 do less than ten minutes brisk walking every month? Is it… a) 4%, b) 14% or c) 40%? Listen to the programme to find out the answer: http://www.bbc.co.uk/learningenglish/english/features/6-minute-english/ep-171005 Vocabulary: vigorous using a lot of energy to do something saunter walk slowly brisk quick and energetic (the opposite of sauntering) build something in (to your day or your life) include it from the beginning incrementally gradually increasing in size sedentary (job or life) it involves a lot of sitting and not much exercise Do you want to learn how to speak English? Then join us here on YouTube for great grammar, drama, news, study, pronunciation, vocabulary, music, interviews and celebrity videos. Every day we have a new video to help you with English. We also produce regular 'extra' videos across the week so come back every day to see what's new. MONDAY: The English We Speak TUESDAY: News Review TUESDAY: English At Work WEDNESDAY: LingoHack THURSDAY: 6 Minute English FRIDAY: The Experiment (watch this space for new and exciting content that we are trying out!) For more videos and content that will help you learn English, visit our website: http://www.bbclearningenglish.com
Views: 170827 BBC Learning English
Vocabulary: How to use linking words to connect ideas in English
 
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Discourse markers are words and phrases we use to connect and organise our ideas. They act like signposts, telling the listener what information is coming up next. Sian will share eight discourse markers with you – and she'll let you listen to her telephone conversation to do this! For more, visit our website: http://www.bbc.co.uk/learningenglish/english/course/towards-advanced/unit-16/session-1 Transcript: Hi Sian here for BBC Learning English. There are signposts everywhere - today in this Masterclass we're going to look at ways you can use signposting when you're speaking. So, there are signposts everywhere and they tell us where to go, but did you know that when we're speaking we use signpost words and phrases to help direct the listener? These are called discourse markers. They help connect what we're saying and tell the listener what information is coming up. They'll help you sound more fluent and help you understand native speaker conversations. Listen to my telephone call this morning. I use eight different discourse markers – can you hear all eight...? ...You know I was hosting an amazing dinner party last night? Actually, it was a complete disaster - I burnt the meat… people arrived when I was still cooking. Mind you, I did say 'turn up when you want'… and I did start cooking pretty late! Anyway, as I was saying, I burnt the meat, the dishes were all ready at different times... the dessert was… oh come to think of it, I completely forgot to serve dessert! So basically, everyone went home hungry. Anyway, how was your evening? By the way, before I forget, it's my birthday next week and I'm having a dinner party do you want to come? So the first discourse marker I used was you know, we use this to say: 'I'm going to tell you some information that you already know.' ''You know I was hosting an amazing dinner party last night?'' The second one I used was actually - we use this when we're about to give some surprising information or correct some information. "Actually, it was a complete disaster". Then I used mind you - we use this when we're about to give an afterthought that contrasts the information that came before, so, "people arrived when I was still cooking. Mind you, I did say 'turn up when you want'..." The next discourse marker I used was anyway, as I was saying. As I was saying is very useful because it means: 'I'm going to return to what I was talking about before'. So, "as I was saying, I burnt the meat" This is a previous topic. Then I used the discourse marker come to think of it, we use this when you've just remembered or thought of something as you're speaking "oh come to think of it, I completely forgot to serve dessert!" I'm remembering this as I'm speaking. Then I used basically - basically is used to summarise what you're going to say. "So basically, everyone went home hungry". The next one I used was anyway - anyway is really useful and very common. We use it to say 'I'm going to change topic now' or 'I'm going to go back to the original topic' or 'I'm going to finish what I was talking about'. "Anyway, how was your evening?" And the final one I used was by the way - we use this to say 'I'm going to change direction and talk about something that's not connected to the main topic. "By the way, before I forget, it's my birthday next week." So basically that's your introduction to discourse markers. We use them all the time, when we're speaking... and come to think of it, when we're writing too. By the way, we have a website bbclearningenglish.com where you can practise these and find out more information. Anyway see you soon. Goodbye.
Views: 171466 BBC Learning English
Michelle Obama and her mission to inspire women: 6 Minute English
 
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Michelle Obama left the White House with her husband, President Barack Obama, in 2016, but she's still very much in the news. In a recent visit to the UK to publicise her autobiography, the former First Lady of the US indicated that her official position may have come to an end, but she continues with her mission to try to inspire girls and women all over the world. Rob and Dan talk about Michelle Obama and teach you new vocabulary. You'll find the transcript and the vocabulary on our website: http://www.bbc.co.uk/learningenglish/english/features/6-minute-english/ep-181227 [Picture: Getty Images] Learn English with our free English videos everyday on BBC Learning English's website and YouTube channel. Learning English is easy - Improve with our free English videos and lessons on grammar, vocabulary, pronunciation and English exams. Please use English when you comment. Visit our website: http://www.bbclearningenglish.com
Views: 88089 BBC Learning English
Why we press buttons: 6 Minute English
 
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Buttons are what we have on our clothes to fasten them but the word is also used for things that we push to make things happen. Things like your bedside alarm, radio, toaster, kettle. We press hundreds of buttons every week without thinking about it. Sometimes we are just drawn to pushing them, but as this programme discusses, for some people have a button phobia. This week's question Not everyone likes buttons, particularly the ones we have on our clothes. It’s a recognised phobia. What is this fear called? Is it A: buttonophobia B: koumpounophobia C: coulrophobia Listen to the programme to find out the answer. Vocabulary buttons small, usually round, objects we use to fasten clothes, also objects we can press to make different things happen, e.g. You press a button to call a lift temptation something that makes you feel like you want to do something you shouldn’t, e.g. Having a big red button with the words ‘Don’t Press’ on it, would be a big temptation, I’d just want to press it. convenient something that is convenient is easy to use without difficulty, e.g. the buttons on are lift are convenient to use. fidgeting not being able to stay still, always moving around to get comfortable or prevent boredom. e.g. My mum always told me to stop fidgeting in the cinema as it was disturbing the other customers. digital fingers and toes are digits – digital = having fingers and toes grooming making ourselves look nice by cleaning, washing and doing our hair, for example To download a transcript and audio, look here http://www.bbc.co.uk/learningenglish/... For more English videos and English lessons to help you learn English: www'bbclearningenglish.com Learn English with our free English videos everyday on BBC Learning English's website and YouTube channel. Learning English is easy Improve with our free English videos and lessons on grammar, vocabulary, pronunciation and English exams. We like receiving and reading your comments - please use English when you comment. For more free English lessons and videos visit our website: http://www.bbclearningenglish.com
Views: 45141 BBC Learning English
Pronunciation: Linking /w/
 
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Tim's back in his pronunciation workshop. This time he's looking at an aspect of connected speech called linking /w/. Find out what it is and how to use it - and why Tim needs an ambulance! For more, visit our website: http://www.bbc.co.uk/learningenglish/english/course/towards-advanced/unit-7/session-5 Transcript: Tim Hi, I'm Tim and this is my pronunciation workshop. Here, I'm gonna show you how English is really spoken. It'll help you become a better listener and a more fluent speaker. Come on, let's go inside. When we speak English fluently we sometimes add extra sounds in between the words to help them link together. Now, have a look at my feet. What's wrong with this? Let's ask the people of London: Voxpops The shoe is on the other foot. The shoe is on the wrong foot. The shoe is on the wrong foot. The shoe is on the wrong foot. Tim 'Shoe' ends in the sound /u:/ and 'is' begins with the sound /ɪ/. But can you hear another sound linking them together? Have another listen: Voxpops The shoe is on the other foot. The shoe is on the wrong foot. The shoe is on the wrong foot. The shoe is on the wrong foot. Tim When one word ends in an /u:/ sound and the next begins in a vowel sound we can just about hear another sound in between. This sound is a bit like /w/. So 'The shoe is…' becomes 'The shoewis'. This is called the linking /w/ - but it's important to remember that it's not a full /w/ sound. It happens because the mouth moves from an /u:/ sound to a vowel sound and on the way it passes through the /w/ mouth shape. Here are some more examples: Examples When do I have to be there? I haven't got a clue at all. That glue is really strong. I really can't do it. Tim So, you've heard the examples, and now it's your turn. Are you ready? Listen and repeat. Examples When do I have to be there? I haven't got a clue at all. That glue is really strong. I really can't do it. Tim Well done. Now remember, if you want to learn more about pronunciation, please visit our website, bbclearningenglish.com. And that's about it from the pronunciation workshop this week. See you soon. Bye. Now I really must get this other shoe on, otherwise I'm going to have an accident. Aaah! Too late.
Views: 88754 BBC Learning English
Study Skills – How to think critically
 
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You know how to find sources and include them in your assignments – but do you know how to evaluate their worth critically? This is key for success and will help you become a top-class distance learner. Find out how in this episode of our Study Skills series – part of our 'Go The Distance' course, giving you the skills and knowledge you need to be a top-class distance learner! For more information about academic know-how, English language and study skills for distance learners, visit us at http://www.bbc.co.uk/learningenglish/gothedistance. To find out more about our partner, The Open University, go to http://www.open.edu/openlearn/tv-radio-events/events/go-the-distance.
Views: 63640 BBC Learning English
Making a pitch – 13 – English at Work gets your pitch perfect
 
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Oh no! Anna's making a pitch to Mr Lime and his team at Citrus Ventures, but her presentation is not going to plan. Her computer has crashed and the presentation, along with her notes, has frozen. She's on her own now and all she can do is talk... but what can she say? This is where she really needs some skills to help her pitch the Imperial Lemon. To pitch something means to do a sales presentation. For more English at Work and other great content:: http://www.bbc.co.uk/learningenglish/english/features/english-at-work TRANSCRIPT Narrator: Hello, welcome back to the offices of Citrus Ventures! (broken computer and murmur of people at meeting, as proceedings have been interrupted) Anna's presentation to Mr Lime and his colleagues continues... Well, almost! Her computer has jammed and the presentation, along with her notes, are frozen. Anna: Oh no, this is terrible! Narrator: Anna, you're going to have to manage without the slideshow or notes. Just talk! Anna: Just talk! Just talk! You just talk! What on earth am I going to say? My mind is blank. Narrator: Try to remember the key points you wanted to share, and give them one by one. If you can, give some facts that support each point. For example: Tip Top Trading is growing fast – our number of clients doubled last year. Use phrases like this: The company has a strong track record of... Let me share with you... The Imperial Lemon's key strengths are... Anna: OK. Ahem! (murmurs die down) Sorry about that, I'll just have to continue talking without the slideshow. So, ahem.... Tip Top Trading is growing fast – our number of clients doubled last year. This is because our company- Narrator: Yes, but try not to bark out information like a robot. Look people in the eye, slow down and try to be more conversational….oh, and smile! Anna: (more conversationally) Tip Top Trading is growing fast – our number of clients doubled last year. This is because our company has a strong track record of reliability and because, thanks to new technology, our fruits are more and more convincing. Our bananas have won awards for being the most authentic-looking fruits in Europe. We are very happy that Citrus Ventures is already among our clients and we hope to build on that by offering you more exciting new fruits. Let me share with you our latest product: (sound of unzipping of a bag) the Imperial Lemon. (impressed murmur from the audience) The Imperial Lemon's key strengths are its design and flexibility. It is made with revolutionary faux-orange-premium, laser-curve-definition technology... (fade out) Narrator: What an excellent performance from Anna. She focussed on some key points, supported them with facts and structured her answer clearly. She also managed to relax and sound more natural. She used these phrases: The company has a strong track record of... Let me share with you... The Imperial Lemon's key strengths are... Let's fast-forward to after the meeting to see if she gets an order. Anna: …so thank you for your time, I hope you're impressed with our Imperial Lemon. Mr Lime: Fantastic Anna, fantastic! Anna: Thank you. Mr Lime: Those... lemons – wow. I'd like to put in an order for three hundred thousand right away. Anna: Of course. Mr Lime: Now, what's your direct phone number? Narrator: Good work. Although, I must say, Mr Lime seems just as excited about Anna as he is about the lemons. Hmm....watch out Anna! Until next time!
Views: 68136 BBC Learning English
Keep a lid on it: The English We Speak
 
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Feifei needs to stop Rob giving her his terrible homemade food. Neil has a useful expression for her that has two meanings. Which one will Feifei use and will it solve the problem? Find out in this episode of The English We Speak. [Images: Getty Images] You'll find the transcript on our website: http://www.bbc.co.uk/learningenglish/english/features/the-english-we-speak/ep-190325 Learning English is easy! Improve your English with our free English videos and lessons on grammar, vocabulary, pronunciation and English exams. Please use English when you comment. For more free English lessons and videos visit our website: http://www.bbclearningenglish.com
Views: 23730 BBC Learning English
BBC English Masterclass: Giving emphasis
 
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How can you change the structure of a sentence to add emphasis? Find out about cleft sentences in this Masterclass with Sian. For more, visit our website: http://www.bbc.co.uk/learningenglish/english/course/towards-advanced/unit-12/session-1 TRANSCRIPT Sian Hi, Sian here for BBC Learning English. And today we're going to look at ways of giving emphasis. OK, so one way of giving emphasis is by using a cleft sentence. What's that? Well, basically a cleft sentence is a way of cutting a sentence in half so that you can give emphasis to the important or new information. It tells the listener or reader what information they need to pay attention to. Let's have an example: Sian Rob ate my biscuits yesterday. Voice Ah, so Catherine ate your biscuits yesterday. Sian It was Rob that ate my biscuits. Voice I hear Rob ate your lunch. Sian No, it was my biscuits that Rob ate yesterday. Voice I can't believe Rob ate your biscuits this morning. Sian It was yesterday that Rob ate my biscuits. OK, so I said the same sentence in three different ways but each time, the emphasis changed. I did this by using an 'it' cleft. Let's have a look in more detail. So we have it is or it was - so here's our 'it' cleft - followed by the key information we want to emphasise, followed by that and then the rest of the message. So, let's look at the examples we had. Here we want to emphasise Rob. So, "It was Rob that ate my biscuits," not Catherine. Here, because it's a person, we can also use 'who', although 'that' is more common. Now, I want to emphasise that it was biscuits, not lunch. So, "It was my biscuits that Rob ate, not my lunch." Notice this is plural but we still use 'was' not 'were' here. And then finally, I want to emphasise that it was yesterday. So, "It was yesterday that Rob ate my biscuits," not today. Let's look at a few more examples. If we want to talk about the present, we use it is and the verb in the present. So, "It is me that does all the work." We can also put this structure into the question form. So, "Was it you that told him?" And we can make it negative. "It wasn't me that told him." This last sentence, we could also use 'I' instead of 'me', but this is much more formal. So, "It wasn't I who told him." So, that was your introduction to the 'it' cleft. Now, these structures are really useful in writing because when we're writing, we can't stress or give intonation, so it helps to emphasise key information. They're also common when we're speaking. But you have to remember to stress the key information. So, for example, "It was his smile that I first noticed." Or, "It was only a year ago that we met." Now, it's practice that you really need. So, go to our website - bbclearningenglish.com - for more information and to practise these structures. Goodbye!
Views: 46573 BBC Learning English
Pronunciation: The intrusive /r/
 
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Tim's hard at work in the pronunciation workshop. This time, he's talking about sounds that you can hear, even when they don't - or shouldn't - exist! For more, visit our website: http://www.bbc.co.uk/learningenglish/english/course/towards-advanced/unit-5/session-5 Transcript: Tim Hi, I'm Tim and this is my pronunciation workshop. Here I'm gonna show you how English is really spoken. It'll help you become a better listener and a more fluent speaker. Come on, let's go inside. Have you ever seen a ghost? No, of course you haven't, because they don't exist. But have you ever heard a sound that wasn't there? Well, if you've listened to lots of real English, you probably have. We asked the people of London what they think is the most important thing the government should prioritise. This is what they said: Voxpops I think law and order is important. Yes, I think law and order is important. Law and order is very important. We all think that law and order is important. I think law and order is very important. Tim Meet my boys. 'Law' and 'order'. Join them together with the word 'and' and you can hear another sound after the word 'law'. Listen out for it. Voxpops I think law and order is important. Yes, I think law and order is important. Law and order is very important. We all think that law and order is important. I think law and order is very important. Tim In fluent speech, if a word ends in an /ɔː/ sound, like law and the next word begins in an /ə/, you'll often hear a /r/ sound linking them together. Law-r-and order. Law-r-and order. 'Law-r-and order' is easier to say than 'law and order'. It flows better. And this is called intrusion. Now this is a little bit controversial. It doesn't happen in all accents and some people do say it's not the proper way to speak. But it is something you will hear. Just remember the /r/ sound is not very strong. Here are some other examples: Examples Can you draw a circle freehand? My dog hurt its paw on some broken glass. There was a flaw in the argument. I saw a good film last night. Tim Right, so you've heard the examples, now it's your turn. Are you ready to give it a try? Listen and repeat. Examples Can you draw a circle freehand? My dog hurt its paw on some broken glass. There was a flaw in the argument. I saw a good film last night. Tim How did you do? Well done. Now, if you want to read more about this topic, please visit our website bbclearningenglish.com. That's it from the pronunciation workshop for this week. Bye. Now, do you want a war or what? Ow!
Views: 125481 BBC Learning English
Objectification: Is there really a 'perfect body'? Listen to 6 Minute English
 
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Impossibly attractive and implausibly perfect models in adverts and in movies and on TV you are much more likely to see naked or half-naked women than men. But there seems to be a trend to objectify men too. Is there any positive points to it or is it creating self-absorbed people? Listen to the discussion. Vocabulary objectification - the noun for when we reduce a human being to an object, we don't think of them as a real person anymore role model - someone whose behaviour is a good example that others want to copy aspire to - aim to be, hope to achieve detrimental - an adjective for something that is bad for you, something that has a negative effect narcissism - the term for someone who is so obsessed with their own body and life that they don't care about anyone else self-conscious (about their body) - someone embarrassed about their body losing confidence in themselves as a result You'll find the transcript here: http://www.bbc.co.uk/learningenglish/... Learn English with BBC Learning English. Every day we help you to learn English with our brilliant mix of grammar, vocabulary, pronunciation, news and inspiring English programmes. We also produce regular 'extra' videos across the week so come back every day to see what's new. Regular content MONDAY: The English We Speak MONDAY: English in a Minute TUESDAY: News Review WEDNESDAY: LingoHack THURSDAY: 6 Minute English FRIDAY: Editor's Choice Please use English when you comment. For more videos and content that will help you learn English, visit our website: http://www.bbclearningenglish.com
Views: 60839 BBC Learning English
Lie vs Lay - English In A Minute
 
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'Lay' and 'lie' are easy words to confuse! Learn the difference with English In A Minute! Sian's going to show you the differences between lay and lie! Watch the video then answer the question! Is this sentence correct? If not, can you fix it? ‘I like to lay on the beach and read a book.’ ☺️Visit our website for the transcript, a summary and more quizzes: http://www.bbc.co.uk/learningenglish/english/course/eiam/unit-1/session-33 Learn English with BBC Learning English. Every day we help you to learn English with our brilliant mix of grammar, vocabulary, pronunciation, news and inspiring English programmes. We also produce regular 'extra' videos across the week so come back every day to see what's new. Regular content MONDAY: The English We Speak MONDAY: English in a Minute TUESDAY: News Review WEDNESDAY: LingoHack THURSDAY: 6 Minute English FRIDAY: Editor's Choice Please use English when you comment. For more videos and content that will help you learn English, visit our website: http://www.bbclearningenglish.com ( 🤫 About the sentence: it’s not correct. Here you need the verb ‘lie’. The correct sentence is: ‘I like to lie on the beach and read a book.’)
Views: 45860 BBC Learning English
Are you big on small talk? Learn what it means in The English We Speak
 
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What should you talk about when you meet someone for the first time? Here's a phrase to learn that describes making informal conversation about not much. It's a great way to break the ice but unfortunately it's something Feifei couldn't do on her blind date. Find out why and learn more about the expression in this programme. You'll find the transcript on our website: http://www.bbc.co.uk/learningenglish/english/features/the-english-we-speak/ep-190121 [Images: Getty Images] Learning English is easy! Improve your English with our free videos and lessons on grammar, vocabulary, pronunciation and English exams. Please use English when you comment. For more free English lessons and videos visit our website: http://www.bbclearningenglish.com
Views: 43221 BBC Learning English
Politely refusing something – 16 – English at Work helps you make polite refusals
 
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How do you say no politely? Anna needs help following the call from Mr Lime asking her out to lunch. She wants to say no, but doesn’t want to sound rude. Her dilemma is how to refuse his offer politely. She finally plucks up the courage to call him, but how does he respond? For more English at Work and other great content:: http://www.bbc.co.uk/learningenglish/english/features/english-at-work TRANSCRIPT Narrator: Hello! You're joining us again after Anna's call from Mr Lime – he asked her to lunch, remember. Now Anna and Denise are flapping. Denise: ...and before you know it, he'll be asking you to marry him! Trust me Anna, this has happened to me dozens of times! Anna: But I thought he was only interested in the lemons! Please promise me you won’t mention this to anyone. Denise: OK, I promise. Anna: Oh, shhhh! Tom: Good morning. What's going on? Denise: Mr Lime has asked Anna to lunch! Anna: Please… Tom: And? Denise: And it's not to talk business! I saw him looking at her with big eyes, from the moment he first saw her! Anna: Denise! Tom: Old Slimy Limey eh? Lucky Anna! Anna: He's not slimy, it's just… Tom: Don't tell me you said yes?! Anna: Well I didn't know what to say. Tom: You didn't? Anna: No, no, I said I was busy and would call back. I wanted to just say no, but with everyone complaining that I'm not polite on the phone... I just... I didn't know how to say it politely. Tom: Ha ha, I'll tell you what to say. Anna: Hang on, let me write it down... why do all the pens keep disappearing? Denise: Here's one. Anna: Thanks. Okay, I'm listening Tom. Tom: Say: go... Anna: (writing) go... Tom: ...away... Slimy Limey. Anna: Go away Slimy Limey. Are you sure? Tom: Of course! Denise: Don't listen to him Anna. This is what you say: Thank you for your offer. But I'm really sorry, I won't be able to. Then explain why, say I'm afraid… blah blah blah Anna: Blah blah blah? Denise: Say it's against company policy to have non-business lunches with clients. Anna: Meaning? Denise: You're not allowed to if it's not for business. Then say: It wouldn't be appropriate. So, with regret, I'm going to have to say no. Anna: Okay, I think I've got that all down. Thanks. He'll be waiting for my call. (dials phone) Mr Lime: Hello, Seb Lime speaking. Anna: Hello Mr Lime. Mr Lime: Anna! Please, call me Seb. So, when can I invite you to lunch? Denise: (whispering loudly) Thank you for your offer... Anna: Well, thank you for your offer. But I'm really sorry, I won't be able to. Mr Lime: Oh? Denise: (whispering loudly) I'm afraid... Anna: I'm afraid it's against company policy to have non-business lunches with people. Mr Lime: Really? Oh how tedious! Denise: (whispering loudly) It wouldn't be- Anna: Shhh! Mr Lime: Pardon? Anna: No, not shhh you Mr Slimy I meant shhhh Denise! Mr Lime: Mr Slimy? Anna: Oh no! I mean Mr Limey – Lime – er Seb! You see, it wouldn't be appropriate. So, with regret, I'm going to have to say no. Mr Lime: I think I've understood. Goodbye Anna. Anna: Goodbye. Narrator: Oh dear, he didn't take that too well. But, apart from a little mistake, Anna did well there. Here are the phrases she used to politely refuse the offer of lunch: Thank you for your offer. But I'm really sorry, I won't be able to. I'm afraid it is against company policy… It wouldn't be appropriate. With regret, I'm going to have to say no. Good job Anna, bad luck Mr Slimy!
Views: 65649 BBC Learning English
Pronunciation: 'Have to'
 
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Tim's back in his pronunciation workshop. This time he's finding out how English speakers pronounce 'have to' - and he's also finding out what time Londoners get up in the mornings. To get some more practice, visit our website: http://www.bbc.co.uk/learningenglish/english/course/towards-advanced/unit-11/session-5 Transcript: Tim Hi. I'm Tim and this is my Pronunciation workshop. Here I'm going to show you how English is really spoken. It'll help you to become a better listener and a more fluent speaker. Are you ready? Come on, follow me. Now, are you an early bird? Do you catch the worm? Do you even have the faintest idea what I’m talking about? Well, in English, an early bird is someone who gets up early in the morning. Now I hate waking up early, but because of my job sometimes I have to get up before 11 o'clock in the morning. I know - that's terrible, but I do it, just for you. Let’s find out about some other Londoners. Voxpops I have to get up in the morning at six a.m. I have to get up at half past six every morning. I have to get up in the morning at 6.45. I have to get up at 8 o'clock. I have to get up at 5 or 6 o'clock. Tim The word ‘have’ ends in the sound /v/, doesn’t it - or does it? Listen again: what sound can you actually hear? Also, pay attention to the pronunciation of the word ‘to’. Voxpops I have to get up in the morning at six a.m. I have to get up at half past six every morning. I have to get up in the morning at 6.45. I have to get up at 8 o'clock. I have to get up at 5 or 6 o'clock. Tim When we use the verb ‘have’ in its modal form: ‘have to’ meaning an obligation, the /v/ at the end of the word changes to an /f/. Also the vowel sound in the word ‘to’ changes to a schwa - /ə/. ‘Have to’ becomes /hæftə/. Here are some more examples. Examples They have to be there by 10. We have to find another flat. You have to tell me the gossip. I always have to take the train. Tim Right, so you’ve heard the examples, and now it’s your turn. Are you ready to start? Listen and repeat. Examples They have to be there by 10. We have to find another flat. You have to tell me the gossip. I always have to take the train. Tim Well done. Now remember, if you want to learn more about pronunciation, then please visit our website, bbclearningenglish dot com. And that is about it from the workshop for this week: I'll see you soon. Bye bye. Right, now as I got up at the crack of 11.00 in the morning, I’m exhausted – I have to grab 40 winks before the next shoot. Night night. Ah, that's good...
Views: 95798 BBC Learning English
Learn to talk about walks in the countryside in 6 minutes!
 
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You'll find the transcript here: http://www.bbc.co.uk/learningenglish/english/features/6-minute-english/ep-180726 Fewer and fewer people are going out for a walk in the countryside. Our obsession with social media platforms seems to have something to do with it. Neil and Catherine talk about the trend of staying indoors and teach you six items of vocabulary. [Image: GETTY IMAGES] Do you want to learn how to speak English? Then join us here on YouTube for great grammar, drama, news, study, pronunciation, vocabulary, music, interviews and celebrity videos. Every day we have a new video to help you with English. We also produce regular 'extra' videos across the week so come back every day to see what's new. MONDAY: The English We Speak TUESDAY: News Review WEDNESDAY: LingoHack THURSDAY: 6 Minute English FRIDAY: The Experiment (watch this space for new and exciting content that we are trying out!) Please use English when you comment. For more videos and content that will help you learn English, visit our website: http://www.bbclearningenglish.com
Views: 81642 BBC Learning English
Pronunciation: The linking /r/
 
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What happens when a word ends with a /r/ sound - and the next word begins with a vowel sound? Tim looks at connected speech with the help of the Learning English team, some Londoners - and a Russian novel! You can learn more here: http://www.bbc.co.uk/learningenglish/english/course/towards-advanced/unit-2/session-5
Views: 124961 BBC Learning English
To play a blinder: The English We Speak
 
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Feifei has just scored three amazing goals for BBC Learning English FC. But when Rob says she has ‘played a blinder’, does that mean Feifei has damaged anyone’s eyesight? Let’s hope not! [Images: GETTY IMAGES] You can download the audio and transcript here http://www.bbc.co.uk/learningenglish/english/features/the-english-we-speak/ep-181001 Do you want to learn how to speak English? Then join us here on YouTube for great grammar, drama, news, study, pronunciation, vocabulary, music, interviews and celebrity videos. Every day we have a new video to help you with English. We also produce regular 'extra' videos across the week so come back every day to see what's new. MONDAY: The English We Speak TUESDAY: News Review WEDNESDAY: LingoHack THURSDAY: 6 Minute English FRIDAY: The Experiment (watch this space for new and exciting content that we are trying out!) Please use English when you comment. For more videos and content that will help you learn English, visit our website: http://www.bbclearningenglish.com
Views: 45580 BBC Learning English
Long Vowel. Pronunciation Tips.
 
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Learn English and improve your pronunciation with our series of 44 videos designed to help improve your pronunciation and English. This is a long vowel programme.
Views: 350105 BBC Learning English
Past habits without 'used to': Stop Saying
 
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Is there another way of talking about past habits without using 'used to'? This is the question that Tim tackles in this video. In it he has to reveal some of the dark secrets of his past as well as some of his present habits, which can't all be recommended. For more, visit our website: http://www.bbc.co.uk/learningenglish/english/course/upper-intermediate/unit-29/session-4
Views: 329564 BBC Learning English

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