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Why do young people feel so lonely? Listen to 6 Minute English
 
06:15
Visit our website: http://www.bbclearningenglish.com We all live in an over-crowded world which is fast approaching eight billion people. Despite that many individuals feel alone and isolated. The BBC made a survey about loneliness, involving 55,000 people from almost 240 different countries. Neil and Sam discuss the findings and teach you new vocabulary. Vocabulary isolated far away from other places and people stereotype the noun for a simplistic view of person or group based on certain characteristics such as their nationality, age, profession and the like intensely strongly plagued by something it causes you problems and difficulties figure something out trying to understand something to regulate to control You'll find the transcript here: http://www.bbc.co.uk/learningenglish/english/features/6-minute-english/ep-181108 [Cover: Getty Images] Learn English with BBC Learning English. Every day we help you to learn English with our brilliant mix of grammar, vocabulary, pronunciation, news and inspiring English programmes. We also produce regular 'extra' videos across the week so come back every day to see what's new. Regular content MONDAY: The English We Speak MONDAY: English in a Minute TUESDAY: News Review WEDNESDAY: LingoHack THURSDAY: 6 Minute English FRIDAY: Editor's Choice Please use English when you comment. For more videos and content that will help you learn English, visit our website: http://www.bbclearningenglish.com
Views: 246507 BBC Learning English
Short Vowel. Pronunciation Tips.
 
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Learn English and improve your pronunciation with our series of 44 videos designed to help improve your pronunciation and English.
Views: 1577004 BBC Learning English
The smell of coffee: 6 Minute English
 
06:17
Is there more to coffee than just drinking it? Experts say that the smell of the beans is just as important. Neil and Catherine discuss the science behind why coffee often smells better than it tastes and teach some new vocabulary along the way. Vocabulary vital very important key essential, necessary a physiological response a reaction your body has to something, like a smell to be baffled by something to be confused by something, to not understand it a chain a group of shops from the same company, all the shops have the same design and sell the same or very similar products weird unusual, strange Download the audio and a transcript here http://www.bbc.co.uk/learningenglish/english/features/6-minute-english/ep-181122 Learn English with BBC Learning English. Every day we help you to learn English with our brilliant mix of grammar, vocabulary, pronunciation, news and inspiring English programmes. We also produce regular 'extra' videos across the week so come back every day to see what's new. Regular content MONDAY: The English We Speak MONDAY: English in a Minute TUESDAY: News Review TUESDAY: English At Work WEDNESDAY: LingoHack THURSDAY: 6 Minute English FRIDAY: Editor's Choice We like receiving and reading your comments - please use English when you comment. For more videos and content that will help you learn English, visit our website: http://www.bbclearningenglish.com
Views: 164405 BBC Learning English
How to prepare for an interview - 01 - English at Work has the answers
 
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Anna has an interview at Tip Top Trading. This episode helps her and you prepare for an interview by providing answers to interview questions. English at work helps you learn the language you need to get a job and to work in an office environment. For more: http://www.bbc.co.uk/learningenglish/english/features/english-at-work
Views: 313745 BBC Learning English
Improving your memory: 6 Minute English
 
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Storing information is an important function of our brains and scientists are always looking at ways to improve it but also to stop it deteriorating. Neil and Rob discuss ways of improving your memory and teach you new vocabulary - that they hope you'll remember later! You'll find the transcript and vocabulary on our website: http://www.bbc.co.uk/learningenglish/english/features/6-minute-english/ep-190131 [Image: Getty Images] Learning English is easy! Improve your English with our free English videos and lessons on grammar, vocabulary, pronunciation and English exams. Please use English when you comment. For more free English lessons and videos visit our website: http://www.bbclearningenglish.com
Views: 99891 BBC Learning English
Would you eat less meat to save the environment? Listen to 6 Minute English
 
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Could you eat less meat and adopt a diet based on vegetables and fruit to help save the environment? Neil and Catherine talk about a new diet, known as flexitarianism, and teach you new vocabulary. You'll find the transcript and vocabulary on our website: http://www.bbc.co.uk/learningenglish/english/features/6-minute-english/ep-190103 [Cover: Getty Images] Learning English is easy! Improve your English with our free English videos and lessons on grammar, vocabulary, pronunciation and English exams. Please use English when you comment. For more free English lessons and videos visit our website: http://www.bbclearningenglish.com
Views: 83827 BBC Learning English
Street food: Why is it becoming popular?
 
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Buying food on the street is nothing new but in the UK this idea is really taking off. It's a great way of sampling freshly cooked dishes from around the world. Rob and Neil discuss the subject and hear from an expert who explains the popularity in this type of food - plus you can learn some new vocabulary along the way. Listen to a discussion about street food and learn new items of vocabulary in just 6 minutes! To download the audio and transcript, go to http://www.bbc.co.uk/learningenglish/english/features/6-minute-english/ep-180830 [Cover: GETTY IMAGES] Do you want to learn how to speak English? Then join us here on YouTube for great grammar, drama, news, study, pronunciation, vocabulary, music, interviews and celebrity videos. Every day we have a new video to help you with English. We also produce regular 'extra' videos across the week so come back every day to see what's new. MONDAY: The English We Speak TUESDAY: News Review WEDNESDAY: LingoHack THURSDAY: 6 Minute English FRIDAY: The Experiment (watch this space for new and exciting content that we are trying out!) Please use English when you comment. For more videos and content that will help you learn English, visit our website: http://www.bbclearningenglish.com
Views: 134991 BBC Learning English
Why do men want to be fathers? Watch 6 Minute English
 
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Why do men want to have children? Evolutionary anthropologist Anna Machin wrote a book about it and tries to answer this question. Catherine and Neil - a father himself - discuss her theories and teach you six items of related vocabulary. Vocabulary: admit to something say something is true, even if it might make you look a little bit bad to be keen on something to be very interested in and enthusiastic about something going along with something agreeing to do something even though you don't really want to do it an absent father a father who is not at home to spend time with his children disciplinarians people who have strict rules and they give out punishments when these rules aren't followed to be hands-on to be very much involved in something You'll find the transcript here: http://www.bbc.co.uk/learningenglish/english/features/6-minute-english/ep-180816 [Image: GETTY IMAGES] Do you want to learn how to speak English? Then join us here on YouTube for great grammar, drama, news, study, pronunciation, vocabulary, music, interviews and celebrity videos. Every day we have a new video to help you with English. We also produce regular 'extra' videos across the week so come back every day to see what's new. MONDAY: The English We Speak TUESDAY: News Review WEDNESDAY: LingoHack THURSDAY: 6 Minute English FRIDAY: The Experiment (watch this space for new and exciting content that we are trying out!) Please use English when you comment. For more videos and content that will help you learn English, visit our website: http://www.bbclearningenglish.com
Views: 113759 BBC Learning English
What makes you happy? Listen to 6 Minute English
 
06:16
Research has suggested that while personal feelings of pleasure are the accepted definition of happiness in Western cultures, East Asian cultures tend to see happiness as social harmony and in some parts of Africa and India it's more about shared experiences and family. Neil and Rob discuss what makes people happy and ... are happy to teach you new vocabulary. You'll find the transcript here: http://www.bbc.co.uk/learningenglish/english/features/6-minute-english/ep-190124 [Image: Getty Images] Learning English is easy! Improve your English with our free English videos and lessons on grammar, vocabulary, pronunciation and English exams. Please use English when you comment. For more free English lessons and videos visit our website: http://www.bbclearningenglish.com
Views: 90117 BBC Learning English
Are dating apps effective? Listen to 6 Minute English
 
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Research shows that fewer than 5% of people who have used dating apps, actually go out on a date with someone they met through them. Neil and Dan discuss the reasons for it and teach you related vocabulary. You'll find the transcript on our website: http://www.bbc.co.uk/learningenglish/english/features/6-minute-english/ep-190214 [Cover: Getty Images] Learning English is easy! Improve your English with our free English videos and lessons on grammar, vocabulary, pronunciation and English exams. Please use English when you comment. For more free English lessons and videos visit our website: http://www.bbclearningenglish.com
Views: 37978 BBC Learning English
Pronunciation: The words 'was' and 'were'
 
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Tim's back in his Pronunciation Workshop. This time he's finding out how English speakers sometimes pronounce the words 'was' and 'were' - even though he's a bit tired. For more, visit our website: http://www.bbc.co.uk/learningenglish/english/course/towards-advanced/unit-13/session-5 Transcript: Tim Hi. I'm Tim and this is my Pronunciation Workshop. Here, I'm going to show you how English is really spoken. Come on, let's go inside. Oh dear, excuse me. I’m a bit tired: I was out late last night, with the lads. I know, yeah, we didn't get back until 9.30. In the evening. It was a wild night. I know, I know, I am a party animal. Anyway, while I get myself together a bit, let's ask some other people in London what they got up to last night. Voxpops At 9 o'clock last night I was watching a movie. I was laying in bed. I was invited to a dinner at my friend's house. I was playing football I was out drinking. Tim Well well, what interesting lives we all lead. Now they all used the past form of the verb 'to be' – was. Now the word was is made of the sounds /w/, /ɔ:/, / z/, isn’t it? Or is it? Listen again. What sound can you actually hear? Voxpops At 9 o'clock last night I was watching a movie. I was laying in bed. I was invited to a dinner at my friend's house. I was playing football I was out drinking. Tim When the word was is unstressed, as in the examples we’ve just heard, then the vowel sound changes to a schwa - /ə/. So was becomes /wəz/, and also were becomes /wə/. These are called weak forms. Here are some more examples. Examples I was there when it happened. We were delighted with the results. We were having a good time until it rained. He was feeling much better last night. Tim Right, now you've heard the examples, and now it's your turn. Listen and repeat. Examples I was there when it happened. We were delighted with the results. We were having a good time until it rained. He was feeling much better last night. Tim Great work. Remember, if you want to learn more about pronunciation, then please visit our website, bbclearningenglish dot com. And that is about it from the Pronunciation Workshop for now. I'll see you soon. Bye bye! Now… oh look! Hey, you know what this is? This is WAS backwards. Get it? WAS backwards… it's a SAW. Now, I know what you were thinking. You were thinking that I was going to have some terrible accident. Well don’t worry – it’s not even switched on – look! Wooahhhhh!!!
Views: 369069 BBC Learning English
How creative should we be? Listen to 6 Minute English
 
06:16
The World Economic Forum forecasts that by 2020, creativity will be in the top three most important skills for future jobs. This is particularly relevant for younger people who will be entering the world of work soon. BBC Learning English's very creative scriptwriter Rob and Neil discuss what it takes to be creative - and they also teach you related vocabulary. Vocabulary a creative (noun) a person whose job is to use a lot of imagination and come up with new ideas, such as someone who works in the media or advertising legitimately describes doing something fairly and reasonably think outside the box find new ways of doing things redress the balance to make things fairer and more equal lifeblood the most important thing to make something a success disparate very different and unrelated headspace when your mind is in a good state and you can think clearly You'll find the transcript here: http://www.bbc.co.uk/learningenglish/english/features/6-minute-english/ep-181025 [Cover: Getty Images] Learn English with BBC Learning English. Every day we help you to learn English with our brilliant mix of grammar, vocabulary, pronunciation, news and inspiring English programmes. We also produce regular 'extra' videos across the week so come back every day to see what's new. Regular content MONDAY: The English We Speak MONDAY: English in a Minute TUESDAY: News Review WEDNESDAY: LingoHack THURSDAY: 6 Minute English FRIDAY: Editor's Choice Please use English when you comment. For more videos and content that will help you learn English, visit our website: http://www.bbclearningenglish.com
Views: 83819 BBC Learning English
BBC English Masterclass: Mixing conditionals
 
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You all know about the first, second and third conditionals, but do you know how to mix them? Dan has a lesson which will show you how. For more, visit our website: http://www.bbc.co.uk/learningenglish/english/course/towards-advanced/unit-7/session-1 Transcript: Dan Hi guys. Dan from BBC Learning English here. In this session we'll be looking at mixed conditionals. Now, I know that clever students like yourselves will know that English has three types of conditional sentences. First conditional is to talk about real, present or future situations, second conditional is to talk about hypothetical present or future situations and third conditional is to talk about hypothetical past situations. All three types of conditional are fantastic and all three types of conditional talk about events within their own time frame – present, future and past. But what about if you want to talk about an event that happened in the past - which affects the future? Can events in the present or the future affect the past? Come over here and let's take a look. Here is a third conditional sentence: If I had taken programming at school, I would have got a job at Google years ago. Here we have a past hypothetical with a past consequence. Notice the formula: 'If' plus the past perfect here, 'would' plus have plus the past participle here. Now watch what happens as we change the consequence. If I had taken programming at school, I would be working for Google. Now we have a past hypothetical with a present consequence. This part here is from a second conditional. Its formula is 'would' plus the bare infinitive. This kind of makes sense in that decisions or actions in the past affect the present. But can we do the future? Well, let's have a look. If I had taken programming at school, I would be attending the Google conference next week. Yes we can. As you can see, the only difference between the present and the future is the time expression. The formula is exactly the same: 'would' plus the infinitive. Second conditional. Did you get it? Now let's see what happens if we try to make the second – which is the present – affect the past, which is a third. If I were smarter, I would have invented something clever when I was younger. It can. Now we have a present theory with a past result. This can be a little difficult to understand, until we realise that 'if I were smarter' is the same as saying 'I am not smart' - which is present simple. And remember that we use present simple for long term truth. When I say 'I am not smart', I mean: I am not smart now, in the future and in the past. It's the same as saying 'I am English' - past, present and future. So, this kind of conditional works very well with personal descriptions. And here are a couple of other examples. If he were taller, he would have become a basketball player. If they were in love, they would have got married 10 years ago. If I were less interesting, I wouldn't have been asked to speak in public so many times. Did you get it? Good. Let's try one more. Present to past. But a little bit more specific this time. If I weren't flying on holiday next week, I would have accepted that new project at work. Here we have a present second, although it's actually future, with a past third result. This means that the person couldn't accept the project at work because they knew that they would be flying in the future. OK guys, did you get it? Mixing conditionals isn't difficult to do, as long as you both have confidence and an understanding of the verb forms. It's much easier to do a third to second than it is to do a second to third, but both are possible. And finally, don't forget the importance of time words. OK? Alright. Now, for more information have a look at bbclearningenglish.com. I've been Dan, you've been great. Have fun guys, see you next time.
Views: 50877 BBC Learning English
Describing Generation Z: 6 Minute English
 
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In this programme, we look at Generation Z - a name that describes the people born in the late nineties or early noughties. Also known as Gen Z, they are seen as the social media generation. We discuss other characteristics of this young generation and learn some new vocabulary along the way. This week's question: No one can quite agree on who first used the term 'social media', but we do know from which decade it came. Was it... a) the 1980s b) the 1990s c) the noughties, that is the first decade of the 21st Century. Listen to the programme to find out the answer. Vocabulary generations this is a term used to describe people born in a particular period of time (usually, but not always a period of about 18 to 20 years) noughties first decade of the 21st Century from 2000 to 2009 to cater for to provide something that is needed or wanted for a particular group tech-innate, hyper-informed consumers (here) describes people who are extremely comfortable with modern technology and social media and as a result have a lot of information about what's going on in the world savvy smart and intelligent the norm what is normal, what is usual for someone [Getty Images] You'll find the transcript here: http://www.bbc.co.uk/learningenglish/english/features/6-minute-english/ep-181004 Learn English with BBC Learning English. Every day we help you to learn English with our brilliant mix of grammar, vocabulary, pronunciation, news and inspiring English programmes. We also produce regular 'extra' videos across the week so come back every day to see what's new. Regular content MONDAY: The English We Speak MONDAY: English in a Minute TUESDAY: News Review TUESDAY: English At Work WEDNESDAY: LingoHack THURSDAY: 6 Minute English FRIDAY: Editor's Choice We like receiving and reading your comments - please use English when you comment. For more videos and content that will help you learn English, visit our website: http://www.bbclearningenglish.com
Views: 71963 BBC Learning English
Pronunciation: Assimilation of /t/ and /p/
 
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What happens when a word ending with a /t/ sound is followed by a word beginning with a /p/ sound? Tim looks at assimilation, with the help of the Learning English team, some Londoners - and a white piece of paper! You can learn more here http://www.bbc.co.uk/learningenglish/english/course/towards-advanced/unit-1/session-5
Views: 164483 BBC Learning English
Short Vowel. Pronunciation Tips.
 
01:59
Learn English and improve your pronunciation with our series of 44 videos designed to help improve your pronunciation and English.
Views: 553415 BBC Learning English
Learn to talk about exercise in 6 minutes
 
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[Images: GETTY IMAGES] How many steps do you walk a day? Do you know the more the better for your health. Neil and Rob talk about the need to exercise and teach you some related vocabulary. This week's question: How many people aged between 40 and 60 do less than ten minutes brisk walking every month? Is it… a) 4%, b) 14% or c) 40%? Listen to the programme to find out the answer: http://www.bbc.co.uk/learningenglish/english/features/6-minute-english/ep-171005 Vocabulary: vigorous using a lot of energy to do something saunter walk slowly brisk quick and energetic (the opposite of sauntering) build something in (to your day or your life) include it from the beginning incrementally gradually increasing in size sedentary (job or life) it involves a lot of sitting and not much exercise Do you want to learn how to speak English? Then join us here on YouTube for great grammar, drama, news, study, pronunciation, vocabulary, music, interviews and celebrity videos. Every day we have a new video to help you with English. We also produce regular 'extra' videos across the week so come back every day to see what's new. MONDAY: The English We Speak TUESDAY: News Review TUESDAY: English At Work WEDNESDAY: LingoHack THURSDAY: 6 Minute English FRIDAY: The Experiment (watch this space for new and exciting content that we are trying out!) For more videos and content that will help you learn English, visit our website: http://www.bbclearningenglish.com
Views: 164027 BBC Learning English
Vocabulary: How to use linking words to connect ideas in English
 
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Discourse markers are words and phrases we use to connect and organise our ideas. They act like signposts, telling the listener what information is coming up next. Sian will share eight discourse markers with you – and she'll let you listen to her telephone conversation to do this! For more, visit our website: http://www.bbc.co.uk/learningenglish/english/course/towards-advanced/unit-16/session-1 Transcript: Hi Sian here for BBC Learning English. There are signposts everywhere - today in this Masterclass we're going to look at ways you can use signposting when you're speaking. So, there are signposts everywhere and they tell us where to go, but did you know that when we're speaking we use signpost words and phrases to help direct the listener? These are called discourse markers. They help connect what we're saying and tell the listener what information is coming up. They'll help you sound more fluent and help you understand native speaker conversations. Listen to my telephone call this morning. I use eight different discourse markers – can you hear all eight...? ...You know I was hosting an amazing dinner party last night? Actually, it was a complete disaster - I burnt the meat… people arrived when I was still cooking. Mind you, I did say 'turn up when you want'… and I did start cooking pretty late! Anyway, as I was saying, I burnt the meat, the dishes were all ready at different times... the dessert was… oh come to think of it, I completely forgot to serve dessert! So basically, everyone went home hungry. Anyway, how was your evening? By the way, before I forget, it's my birthday next week and I'm having a dinner party do you want to come? So the first discourse marker I used was you know, we use this to say: 'I'm going to tell you some information that you already know.' ''You know I was hosting an amazing dinner party last night?'' The second one I used was actually - we use this when we're about to give some surprising information or correct some information. "Actually, it was a complete disaster". Then I used mind you - we use this when we're about to give an afterthought that contrasts the information that came before, so, "people arrived when I was still cooking. Mind you, I did say 'turn up when you want'..." The next discourse marker I used was anyway, as I was saying. As I was saying is very useful because it means: 'I'm going to return to what I was talking about before'. So, "as I was saying, I burnt the meat" This is a previous topic. Then I used the discourse marker come to think of it, we use this when you've just remembered or thought of something as you're speaking "oh come to think of it, I completely forgot to serve dessert!" I'm remembering this as I'm speaking. Then I used basically - basically is used to summarise what you're going to say. "So basically, everyone went home hungry". The next one I used was anyway - anyway is really useful and very common. We use it to say 'I'm going to change topic now' or 'I'm going to go back to the original topic' or 'I'm going to finish what I was talking about'. "Anyway, how was your evening?" And the final one I used was by the way - we use this to say 'I'm going to change direction and talk about something that's not connected to the main topic. "By the way, before I forget, it's my birthday next week." So basically that's your introduction to discourse markers. We use them all the time, when we're speaking... and come to think of it, when we're writing too. By the way, we have a website bbclearningenglish.com where you can practise these and find out more information. Anyway see you soon. Goodbye.
Views: 162669 BBC Learning English
Speaking: Being polite - how to soften your English
 
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Improve your English speaking by learning how to be more polite. Sian's going to show you 4 ways not to offend people by being too direct. For downloadable grammar notes and a 'polite English' quiz, visit our website: http://www.bbc.co.uk/learningenglish/english/course/towards-advanced/unit-24/session-1 TRANSCRIPT Sian Hi Sian here for BBC Learning English… in this Masterclass we're going to look at something British people love doing! Being polite. No, I'm not coming to your party this evening. Wow, this food is disgusting! Give me some of your lunch. Now sometimes it’s ok to be direct – or even blunt with your friends…but it's important not to sound rude, particularly in the workplace. We're going to look at 4 ways you can soften your language to make you more polite… 1: Requests, suggestions and questions. OK, listen to these two requests. Which one sounds more polite and less direct, and why? Number 1: ‘Pick me up on your way to the party this evening!’ Or number 2: ‘I was hoping you could give me a lift to the party.’ Now, number 2 is much more polite. We soften requests, and suggestions and questions by using past forms, continuous forms or both. For example, ‘I was wondering if you could give me a lift later.’ We can also make requests softer by using a negative question with a question tag. So, ‘You couldn’t give me a lift later, could you?’ or ‘I don’t suppose you could pick me up tonight, could you?’ 2: Giving opinions OK, listen to these two opinions. Which do you think sounds less direct and more polite? Number 1: You're too young to get married! Or number 2: I reckon you're a little young to be getting married! Yeah, the second one is much less direct. It’s softer. We use verbs like reckon, guess, feel to make your opinions less direct. You can also use vague expressions like ‘sort of’, ‘kind of’, ‘a little bit’. It also helps if you make it into a question: ‘Aren’t you kind of young to be getting married?’ 3: Discussing problems Ok now listen to these two problems. Which one sounds less direct? The first one: ‘You've made a mistake in this report!’ Or the second one: ‘You seem to have made a mistake here.’ Yes, the second one was softer, less direct. We introduce problems with verbs like seem and appear to soften them. So, ‘You appear to have saved over all my documents’. You can also use these to introduce your own problems. So, ‘I seem to have lost those reports you wanted’. 4: Saying no! Now listen to these two ways of refusing an invitation. Which one sounds less direct? Number 1? ‘No, I'm not coming to your party this evening.’ or number 2? ‘I’m not sure I'll be able to make it to your party this evening.’ Ok, again the second one was much softer, less direct. We find it really hard to say no! So instead we use tentative language to soften it. So, ‘I’m not sure I’ll make it to your party.’ Or ‘It’s looking unlikely I’ll be able to come this evening.’ This basically means ‘I’m not coming!’ Now to find out more about avoiding being too direct, and to practise not being rude, I was hoping you would check out our website bbclearningenglish.com. See you soon, goodbye!
Views: 358092 BBC Learning English
Learn different ways of talking about the future - Stop Saying
 
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http://www.bbclearningenglish.com When we think of the future, if we're thinking grammatically, we think of will. However, the future can be different depending on what we're talking about. Will is not the only future, as Tim explores in this video. Learn more here http://www.bbc.co.uk/learningenglish/english/course/upper-intermediate/unit-24/session-4
Views: 76012 BBC Learning English
Formal English and informal English
 
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Sometimes formal and informal English can seem like two different languages. Sian's here to show you four features of informal English - and some ways you can make these features more formal. For more, visit our website: http://www.bbc.co.uk/learningenglish/english/course/towards-advanced/unit-19/session-1 Transcript: Hi, Sian here for BBC Learning English. In this Masterclass we're going to look at some differences between formal and informal English. Hey, how's it going? Good afternoon, how are you? Sometimes formal and informal can seem like two different languages. In the same way you wouldn't normally wear shorts and a t-shirt to a job interview, if you use language that's too formal or too informal, you can give a bad impression. Let's look at some differences between formal and informal English. Now, I received an email this morning. Have a look at this email - do you think the language is formal or informal - and why? Dear Mrs Brown, I'm writing to find out whether you have any jobs in your company this summer. At the mo I'm studying Economics at uni. I have been working part-time in a shop and recently they promoted me to the role of manager. I am enthusiastic. I work hard. I pay attention to detail. Ok, so that email used informal language and it's too informal for this style of letter. We're going to look at four features that make this informal and we're going to change it to make it more formal. Number one: choice of vocabulary. In informal English we use more common words and more phrasal verbs. For example here we have a phrasal verb: find out. It would be better to use a more formal equivalent like enquire. Same with jobs, this is quite informal, so instead let's use vacancies here. Instead we have "I'm writing to enquire whether you have any vacancies." Number two. It's more common in informal language to use abbreviations, contractions, shortened forms of verbs. Let's have a look. So, here we have at the mo, which is short for at the moment. This is OK when you're speaking, but not when you're writing. Here, we can use currently which is even more formal. Same here, uni is short for university, so don't use this short form in a letter. "Currently, I am studying Economics at university." Quite often in formal language we choose passive structures over active. Let's have a look here. The active sentences they promoted me is quite informal - it'd be much better to use a passive form here to make it more formal: I was promoted. So, "Recently I was promoted to the role of manager." This doesn't mean don't use active structures in a formal letter, but have a think about whether a passive one is more appropriate. Finally, in informal English, short, simple sentences are much more common. Whereas in formal English, we use more complex sentence structures. Take a look at this one. Here we have three short, simple sentences and this is fine in informal English, but in formal English it's better to use a complex structure. We can do this by adding relative pronouns or linkers. For example, "I am an enthusiastic person who works hard and pays attention to detail. So, would you kindly visit our website... ah, we're friends, that's too formal. Go to our website bbclearningenglish.com for more information about this and to practise formal and informal English. See you soon - goodbye!
Views: 110113 BBC Learning English
To be all downhill - The English We Speak
 
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Rob's very pleased with himself. He's done all his work and it's only Wednesday! Does this mean it's all downhill until the weekend? Feifei is about to spoil his fun by explaining there is more than one meaning to the phrase 'to be all downhill'. Find out what they are in this programme. You'll find the transcript here: http://www.bbc.co.uk/learningenglish/english/features/the-english-we-speak/ep-190107 [Images: Getty Images] Learning English is easy! Improve with our free English videos and lessons on grammar, vocabulary, pronunciation and English exams. For more free English lessons and videos visit our website: http://www.bbclearningenglish.com Please use English when you comment.
Views: 35435 BBC Learning English
The teenage brain: 6 Minute English
 
06:34
Introduction: Until recently, it was thought that human brain development was all over by early childhood but research in the last decade has shown that the adolescent brain is still changing into early adulthood. This programme delves inside the teenage brain, hears from an expert and teaches some useful vocabulary along the way to stretch your own brain! This week's question There have always been teenagers, but when was the word ‘teenager’ first used to refer to the 13 – 19 age group? Was it: a) the 1920s b) the 1930s c) the 1950s Listen to the programme to find out the answer. Vocabulary adolescence the period in someone’s life when they are developing from a child to an adult papers published scientific research dogma a set of beliefs that are strongly held and which are not challenged prefrontal cortex an important part of the brain involved in many complex mental actions like planning and personality cognitive tasks mental activities that we consciously have to think about like making plans and taking decisions adolescent the adjective to describe behaviour of someone who is in adolescence. Also, the noun for someone who is in adolescence Do download a transcript and the audio, visit our website http://www.bbc.co.uk/learningenglish/english/features/6-minute-english/ep-181213 Learn English with BBC Learning English. Every day we help you to learn English with our brilliant mix of grammar, vocabulary, pronunciation, news and inspiring English programmes. We also produce regular 'extra' videos across the week so come back every day to see what's new. Regular content MONDAY: The English We Speak MONDAY: English in a Minute TUESDAY: News Review TUESDAY: English At Work WEDNESDAY: LingoHack THURSDAY: 6 Minute English FRIDAY: Editor's Choice We like receiving and reading your comments - please use English when you comment. For more videos and content that will help you learn English, visit our website: http://www.bbclearningenglish.com
Views: 78949 BBC Learning English
Is music getting faster? Listen to 6 Minute English
 
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Music producers are adapting their songs for modern technology. Researchers have found long instrumental introductions to pop songs have become almost extinct. Neil and Rob discuss this new trend and teach you some vocabulary. [Cover: Getty Images] For the transcript and vocabulary, visit our website: http://www.bbc.co.uk/learningenglish/english/features/6-minute-english/ep-190117 Learning English is easy! Improve your English with our free English videos and lessons on grammar, vocabulary, pronunciation and English exams. Please use English when you comment. For more free English lessons and videos visit our website: http://www.bbclearningenglish.com
Views: 65871 BBC Learning English
Study Skills – How to think critically
 
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You know how to find sources and include them in your assignments – but do you know how to evaluate their worth critically? This is key for success and will help you become a top-class distance learner. Find out how in this episode of our Study Skills series – part of our 'Go The Distance' course, giving you the skills and knowledge you need to be a top-class distance learner! For more information about academic know-how, English language and study skills for distance learners, visit us at http://www.bbc.co.uk/learningenglish/gothedistance. To find out more about our partner, The Open University, go to http://www.open.edu/openlearn/tv-radio-events/events/go-the-distance.
Views: 56326 BBC Learning English
Lie vs Lay: English In A Minute
 
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Sian's going to show you the differences between lay and lie! Watch the video then answer the question! Is this sentence correct? If not, can you fix it? ‘I like to lay on the beach and read a book.’ ☺️Visit our website for the transcript, a summary and more quizzes: http://www.bbc.co.uk/learningenglish/english/course/eiam/unit-1/session-33 Learn English with BBC Learning English. Every day we help you to learn English with our brilliant mix of grammar, vocabulary, pronunciation, news and inspiring English programmes. We also produce regular 'extra' videos across the week so come back every day to see what's new. Regular content MONDAY: The English We Speak MONDAY: English in a Minute TUESDAY: News Review WEDNESDAY: LingoHack THURSDAY: 6 Minute English FRIDAY: Editor's Choice Please use English when you comment. For more videos and content that will help you learn English, visit our website: http://www.bbclearningenglish.com ( 🤫 About the sentence: it’s not correct. Here you need the verb ‘lie’. The correct sentence is: ‘I like to lie on the beach and read a book.’)
Views: 40380 BBC Learning English
Pronunciation: 'Have to'
 
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Tim's back in his pronunciation workshop. This time he's finding out how English speakers pronounce 'have to' - and he's also finding out what time Londoners get up in the mornings. To get some more practice, visit our website: http://www.bbc.co.uk/learningenglish/english/course/towards-advanced/unit-11/session-5 Transcript: Tim Hi. I'm Tim and this is my Pronunciation workshop. Here I'm going to show you how English is really spoken. It'll help you to become a better listener and a more fluent speaker. Are you ready? Come on, follow me. Now, are you an early bird? Do you catch the worm? Do you even have the faintest idea what I’m talking about? Well, in English, an early bird is someone who gets up early in the morning. Now I hate waking up early, but because of my job sometimes I have to get up before 11 o'clock in the morning. I know - that's terrible, but I do it, just for you. Let’s find out about some other Londoners. Voxpops I have to get up in the morning at six a.m. I have to get up at half past six every morning. I have to get up in the morning at 6.45. I have to get up at 8 o'clock. I have to get up at 5 or 6 o'clock. Tim The word ‘have’ ends in the sound /v/, doesn’t it - or does it? Listen again: what sound can you actually hear? Also, pay attention to the pronunciation of the word ‘to’. Voxpops I have to get up in the morning at six a.m. I have to get up at half past six every morning. I have to get up in the morning at 6.45. I have to get up at 8 o'clock. I have to get up at 5 or 6 o'clock. Tim When we use the verb ‘have’ in its modal form: ‘have to’ meaning an obligation, the /v/ at the end of the word changes to an /f/. Also the vowel sound in the word ‘to’ changes to a schwa - /ə/. ‘Have to’ becomes /hæftə/. Here are some more examples. Examples They have to be there by 10. We have to find another flat. You have to tell me the gossip. I always have to take the train. Tim Right, so you’ve heard the examples, and now it’s your turn. Are you ready to start? Listen and repeat. Examples They have to be there by 10. We have to find another flat. You have to tell me the gossip. I always have to take the train. Tim Well done. Now remember, if you want to learn more about pronunciation, then please visit our website, bbclearningenglish dot com. And that is about it from the workshop for this week: I'll see you soon. Bye bye. Right, now as I got up at the crack of 11.00 in the morning, I’m exhausted – I have to grab 40 winks before the next shoot. Night night. Ah, that's good...
Views: 92319 BBC Learning English
Why we press buttons: 6 Minute English
 
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Buttons are what we have on our clothes to fasten them but the word is also used for things that we push to make things happen. Things like your bedside alarm, radio, toaster, kettle. We press hundreds of buttons every week without thinking about it. Sometimes we are just drawn to pushing them, but as this programme discusses, for some people have a button phobia. This week's question Not everyone likes buttons, particularly the ones we have on our clothes. It’s a recognised phobia. What is this fear called? Is it A: buttonophobia B: koumpounophobia C: coulrophobia Listen to the programme to find out the answer. Vocabulary buttons small, usually round, objects we use to fasten clothes, also objects we can press to make different things happen, e.g. You press a button to call a lift temptation something that makes you feel like you want to do something you shouldn’t, e.g. Having a big red button with the words ‘Don’t Press’ on it, would be a big temptation, I’d just want to press it. convenient something that is convenient is easy to use without difficulty, e.g. the buttons on are lift are convenient to use. fidgeting not being able to stay still, always moving around to get comfortable or prevent boredom. e.g. My mum always told me to stop fidgeting in the cinema as it was disturbing the other customers. digital fingers and toes are digits – digital = having fingers and toes grooming making ourselves look nice by cleaning, washing and doing our hair, for example To download a transcript and audio, look here http://www.bbc.co.uk/learningenglish/... For more English videos and English lessons to help you learn English: www'bbclearningenglish.com Learn English with our free English videos everyday on BBC Learning English's website and YouTube channel. Learning English is easy Improve with our free English videos and lessons on grammar, vocabulary, pronunciation and English exams. We like receiving and reading your comments - please use English when you comment. For more free English lessons and videos visit our website: http://www.bbclearningenglish.com
Views: 39388 BBC Learning English
Curbing our plastic addiction - 6 Minute English
 
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We use plastic in every part of our lives so could we live without it? Rob and Neil discuss the dilemma of going plastic free and hear why Britain's shopping culture makes it hard to do. Listen to 6 Minute English and learn some useful vocabulary along the way. You'll find the transcript on our website: http://www.bbc.co.uk/learningenglish/english/features/6-minute-english/ep-181011 Learn English with BBC Learning English. Every day we help you to learn English with our brilliant mix of grammar, vocabulary, pronunciation, news and inspiring English programmes. We also produce regular 'extra' videos across the week so come back every day to see what's new. Regular content MONDAY: The English We Speak MONDAY: English in a Minute TUESDAY: News Review WEDNESDAY: LingoHack THURSDAY: 6 Minute English FRIDAY: Editor's Choice Please use English when you comment. For more videos and content that will help you learn English, visit our website: http://www.bbclearningenglish.com
Views: 57956 BBC Learning English
Pronunciation: The intrusive /r/
 
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Tim's hard at work in the pronunciation workshop. This time, he's talking about sounds that you can hear, even when they don't - or shouldn't - exist! For more, visit our website: http://www.bbc.co.uk/learningenglish/english/course/towards-advanced/unit-5/session-5 Transcript: Tim Hi, I'm Tim and this is my pronunciation workshop. Here I'm gonna show you how English is really spoken. It'll help you become a better listener and a more fluent speaker. Come on, let's go inside. Have you ever seen a ghost? No, of course you haven't, because they don't exist. But have you ever heard a sound that wasn't there? Well, if you've listened to lots of real English, you probably have. We asked the people of London what they think is the most important thing the government should prioritise. This is what they said: Voxpops I think law and order is important. Yes, I think law and order is important. Law and order is very important. We all think that law and order is important. I think law and order is very important. Tim Meet my boys. 'Law' and 'order'. Join them together with the word 'and' and you can hear another sound after the word 'law'. Listen out for it. Voxpops I think law and order is important. Yes, I think law and order is important. Law and order is very important. We all think that law and order is important. I think law and order is very important. Tim In fluent speech, if a word ends in an /ɔː/ sound, like law and the next word begins in an /ə/, you'll often hear a /r/ sound linking them together. Law-r-and order. Law-r-and order. 'Law-r-and order' is easier to say than 'law and order'. It flows better. And this is called intrusion. Now this is a little bit controversial. It doesn't happen in all accents and some people do say it's not the proper way to speak. But it is something you will hear. Just remember the /r/ sound is not very strong. Here are some other examples: Examples Can you draw a circle freehand? My dog hurt its paw on some broken glass. There was a flaw in the argument. I saw a good film last night. Tim Right, so you've heard the examples, now it's your turn. Are you ready to give it a try? Listen and repeat. Examples Can you draw a circle freehand? My dog hurt its paw on some broken glass. There was a flaw in the argument. I saw a good film last night. Tim How did you do? Well done. Now, if you want to read more about this topic, please visit our website bbclearningenglish.com. That's it from the pronunciation workshop for this week. Bye. Now, do you want a war or what? Ow!
Views: 118487 BBC Learning English
Past habits without 'used to': Stop Saying
 
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Is there another way of talking about past habits without using 'used to'? This is the question that Tim tackles in this video. In it he has to reveal some of the dark secrets of his past as well as some of his present habits, which can't all be recommended. For more, visit our website: http://www.bbc.co.uk/learningenglish/english/course/upper-intermediate/unit-29/session-4
Views: 323619 BBC Learning English
Learn to talk about walks in the countryside in 6 minutes!
 
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You'll find the transcript here: http://www.bbc.co.uk/learningenglish/english/features/6-minute-english/ep-180726 Fewer and fewer people are going out for a walk in the countryside. Our obsession with social media platforms seems to have something to do with it. Neil and Catherine talk about the trend of staying indoors and teach you six items of vocabulary. [Image: GETTY IMAGES] Do you want to learn how to speak English? Then join us here on YouTube for great grammar, drama, news, study, pronunciation, vocabulary, music, interviews and celebrity videos. Every day we have a new video to help you with English. We also produce regular 'extra' videos across the week so come back every day to see what's new. MONDAY: The English We Speak TUESDAY: News Review WEDNESDAY: LingoHack THURSDAY: 6 Minute English FRIDAY: The Experiment (watch this space for new and exciting content that we are trying out!) Please use English when you comment. For more videos and content that will help you learn English, visit our website: http://www.bbclearningenglish.com
Views: 66887 BBC Learning English
Michelle Obama and her mission to inspire women: 6 Minute English
 
06:15
Michelle Obama left the White House with her husband, President Barack Obama, in 2016, but she's still very much in the news. In a recent visit to the UK to publicise her autobiography, the former First Lady of the US indicated that her official position may have come to an end, but she continues with her mission to try to inspire girls and women all over the world. Rob and Dan talk about Michelle Obama and teach you new vocabulary. You'll find the transcript and the vocabulary on our website: http://www.bbc.co.uk/learningenglish/english/features/6-minute-english/ep-181227 [Picture: Getty Images] Learn English with our free English videos everyday on BBC Learning English's website and YouTube channel. Learning English is easy - Improve with our free English videos and lessons on grammar, vocabulary, pronunciation and English exams. Please use English when you comment. Visit our website: http://www.bbclearningenglish.com
Views: 63961 BBC Learning English
Do you like high-visibility fashion? Listen to 6 Minute English
 
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Rob and Neil discuss the oddest item of clothing to hit the catwalk this year - the humble hi-vis jacket. They were designed to be worn for safety by people like cyclists and pedestrians and by workers who need to be seen if, for example, they're working in the road or are directing people. So it's strange to think that now people choose to wear them as the latest fashion item. Listen to our discussion and learn new vocabulary along the way. You'll find the transcript here: http://www.bbc.co.uk/learningenglish/english/features/6-minute-english/ep-180927 Learn English with BBC Learning English. Every day we help you to learn English with our brilliant mix of grammar, vocabulary, pronunciation, news and inspiring English programmes. We also produce regular 'extra' videos across the week so come back every day to see what's new. Regular content MONDAY: The English We Speak MONDAY: English in a Minute TUESDAY: News Review WEDNESDAY: LingoHack THURSDAY: 6 Minute English FRIDAY: Editor's Choice Please use English when you comment. For more videos and content that will help you learn English, visit our website: http://www.bbclearningenglish.com
Views: 45536 BBC Learning English
Pronunciation: The linking /r/
 
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What happens when a word ends with a /r/ sound - and the next word begins with a vowel sound? Tim looks at connected speech with the help of the Learning English team, some Londoners - and a Russian novel! You can learn more here: http://www.bbc.co.uk/learningenglish/english/course/towards-advanced/unit-2/session-5
Views: 119536 BBC Learning English
Learn to talk about broken hearts in 6 minutes!
 
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You'll find the transcript here: http://www.bbc.co.uk/learningenglish/english/features/6-minute-english/ep-180628 Our heart is an important organ in our body and something we must take care of. Healthy eating and exercise can keep it in good condition but is it still possible to die from being sad and upset - or what we might call 'a broken heart'? 6 Minute English discusses the subject and hears from an expert who explains if this can really happen. Vocabulary nuanced small but important things that need to be considered bereavement sadness we feel when someone close to us dies passed away a more gentle way of saying ‘died’ muddle through get to the end of a difficult situation somehow. Not always by making the right decisions but in the end, getting there time-poor not having enough free time prioritising deciding how important different things are [Images: GETTY IMAGES] Do you want to learn how to speak English? Then join us here on YouTube for great grammar, drama, news, study, pronunciation, vocabulary, music, interviews and celebrity videos. Every day we have a new video to help you with English. We also produce regular 'extra' videos across the week so come back every day to see what's new. MONDAY: The English We Speak TUESDAY: News Review WEDNESDAY: LingoHack THURSDAY: 6 Minute English FRIDAY: The Experiment (watch this space for new and exciting content that we are trying out!) Please use English when you comment. For more videos and content that will help you learn English, visit our website: http://www.bbclearningenglish.com
Views: 77844 BBC Learning English
Learn to talk about sugar in 6 minutes
 
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[Images: GETTY IMAGES] Do you really know how much of the sweet stuff you eat? Neil and Rob talk about sugar and teach you some tempting new vocabulary. This week's question: If a food contains 5% total sugars per 100g, is it… a) high in sugar b) low in sugar or c) somewhere in the middle? Listen to the programme to find out the answer. Vocabulary: have a sweet tooth like sugary things processed food any food that has been changed in some way by freezing it, putting it in tins, combining foods or adding chemicals at a glance with a quick look fat-free without any fat in it avoid something at all costs do everything you can to avoid it demonise make someone or something seem very bad Do you want to learn how to speak English? Then join us here on YouTube for great grammar, drama, news, study, pronunciation, vocabulary, music, interviews and celebrity videos. Every day we have a new video to help you with English. We also produce regular 'extra' videos across the week so come back every day to see what's new. MONDAY: The English We Speak TUESDAY: News Review TUESDAY: English At Work WEDNESDAY: LingoHack THURSDAY: 6 Minute English FRIDAY: The Experiment (watch this space for new and exciting content that we are trying out!) For more videos and content that will help you learn English, visit our website: http://www.bbclearningenglish.com
Views: 94928 BBC Learning English
Out of your depth - The English We Speak
 
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Feifei's attempt at learning to swim is nothing compared the struggle Rob is having to complete a new project. It's time to learn an English expression that applies to both situations. Listen to the programme to find out why. You'll find the text here: http://www.bbc.co.uk/learningenglish/english/features/the-english-we-speak/ep-180910 [Images: GETTY IMAGES] Do you want to learn how to speak English? Then join us here on YouTube for great grammar, drama, news, study, pronunciation, vocabulary, music, interviews and celebrity videos. Every day we have a new video to help you with English. We also produce regular 'extra' videos across the week so come back every day to see what's new. MONDAY: The English We Speak TUESDAY: News Review WEDNESDAY: LingoHack THURSDAY: 6 Minute English FRIDAY: The Experiment (watch this space for new and exciting content that we are trying out!) Please use English when you comment. For more videos and content that will help you learn English, visit our website: http://www.bbclearningenglish.com
Views: 37612 BBC Learning English
Looking for a job? English at Work is the series for you
 
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English at Work: http://www.bbc.co.uk/learningenglish/english/features/english-at-work Are you looking for work. Do you want a job? Would you want to work at Tip Top Trading? Watch our new animated series and learn some of the language and etiquette that you need, not just to get a job but to be the top dog, big boss, head honcho, big wig.... Animation: Rosie Miles (http://www.rosiesmiles.com/)
Views: 246884 BBC Learning English
Dating apps: How our brains react
 
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Rob and Dan discuss what our brains are doing when we are using dating apps. Listen to the discussion and learn new items of vocabulary in just 6 minutes! To download the audio and transcript, go to http://www.bbc.co.uk/learningenglish/english/features/6-minute-english/ep-180913 [Image: GETTY IMAGES] Do you want to learn how to speak English? Then join us here on YouTube for great grammar, drama, news, study, pronunciation, vocabulary, music, interviews and celebrity videos. Every day we have a new video to help you with English. We also produce regular 'extra' videos across the week so come back every day to see what's new. MONDAY: The English We Speak TUESDAY: News Review WEDNESDAY: LingoHack THURSDAY: 6 Minute English FRIDAY: The Experiment (watch this space for new and exciting content that we are trying out!) Please use English when you comment. For more videos and content that will help you learn English, visit our website: http://www.bbclearningenglish.com
Views: 45636 BBC Learning English
BBC English Masterclass: Giving emphasis
 
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How can you change the structure of a sentence to add emphasis? Find out about cleft sentences in this Masterclass with Sian. For more, visit our website: http://www.bbc.co.uk/learningenglish/english/course/towards-advanced/unit-12/session-1 TRANSCRIPT Sian Hi, Sian here for BBC Learning English. And today we're going to look at ways of giving emphasis. OK, so one way of giving emphasis is by using a cleft sentence. What's that? Well, basically a cleft sentence is a way of cutting a sentence in half so that you can give emphasis to the important or new information. It tells the listener or reader what information they need to pay attention to. Let's have an example: Sian Rob ate my biscuits yesterday. Voice Ah, so Catherine ate your biscuits yesterday. Sian It was Rob that ate my biscuits. Voice I hear Rob ate your lunch. Sian No, it was my biscuits that Rob ate yesterday. Voice I can't believe Rob ate your biscuits this morning. Sian It was yesterday that Rob ate my biscuits. OK, so I said the same sentence in three different ways but each time, the emphasis changed. I did this by using an 'it' cleft. Let's have a look in more detail. So we have it is or it was - so here's our 'it' cleft - followed by the key information we want to emphasise, followed by that and then the rest of the message. So, let's look at the examples we had. Here we want to emphasise Rob. So, "It was Rob that ate my biscuits," not Catherine. Here, because it's a person, we can also use 'who', although 'that' is more common. Now, I want to emphasise that it was biscuits, not lunch. So, "It was my biscuits that Rob ate, not my lunch." Notice this is plural but we still use 'was' not 'were' here. And then finally, I want to emphasise that it was yesterday. So, "It was yesterday that Rob ate my biscuits," not today. Let's look at a few more examples. If we want to talk about the present, we use it is and the verb in the present. So, "It is me that does all the work." We can also put this structure into the question form. So, "Was it you that told him?" And we can make it negative. "It wasn't me that told him." This last sentence, we could also use 'I' instead of 'me', but this is much more formal. So, "It wasn't I who told him." So, that was your introduction to the 'it' cleft. Now, these structures are really useful in writing because when we're writing, we can't stress or give intonation, so it helps to emphasise key information. They're also common when we're speaking. But you have to remember to stress the key information. So, for example, "It was his smile that I first noticed." Or, "It was only a year ago that we met." Now, it's practice that you really need. So, go to our website - bbclearningenglish.com - for more information and to practise these structures. Goodbye!
Views: 43506 BBC Learning English
Learners' Questions: The difference between 'what' and 'which'
 
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'What' and 'which' - both are often possible. Often there is no difference. We can use 'which' for a limited choice. We can use 'what' for unlimited choice. Both can be determiners. Both can talk about people too. For more, visit our website: http://www.bbc.co.uk/learningenglish/english/course/english-you-need/unit-2/session-5 Transcript Hi guys! Dan here for BBC Learning English with this week's Learner Question. Find out what it is after this. OK! This week's learner question comes from Cristina Gutiérrez. And she says: First of all, congratulations on your splendid programmes at BBCLearningEnglish -Thank you so much - They are both entertaining and useful - Good, that’s what we want them to be - I'd like to know what's the exact difference in usage between 'what' and 'which' at the beginning of direct questions. Well, Cristina, as you command, so we obey. Now both are often possible with very little difference. For example: ‘What or which is your favourite food?’ Or ‘Which or What is the best programme on TV at the moment?’ When we feel we have a limited number of choices, we prefer which. So with a menu: ‘Which dessert shall we have?’ Or when looking at a multiple choice test: ‘Which one is the answer?’ On the other hand, what is used when we feel we have an unlimited number of choices. So for example: ‘What shall we have for dinner?’ Or ‘What’s the answer to this question?’ Both can be used as determiners in direct questions when talking about people or things. They are always followed by nouns though. So: when looking at a line of cars I might say: ‘Which car is yours?’ But, in general, I might ask: ‘What car do you drive?’ In talking about people we can use which to ask about identity and what to ask about job. For example: There’s a group of people over there. Which is your friend? Or: ‘Tim’s a lawyer. What’s James?’ I hope that answers your question Cristina. Thank you very much for contacting us. If anybody else out there has a question about English they’d like answered, you can email us on: [email protected] Please remember to include Learners’ Questions in the subject line and your name and your country. You can also go to our website: bbclearningenglish.com. I’ve been Dan and I’ll see you next time on Learners’ Questions.
Views: 33472 BBC Learning English
Giving feedback – 14 – English at Work shows you how
 
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Anna gets feedback from Paul today. Following her successful Imperial Lemon presentation, Anna thinks she's going to get some good feedback from the boss. But rather than being congratulated, she's in trouble because of her poor telephone manner. However, help is at hand, and from an unexpected person... For more English at Work and other great content:: http://www.bbc.co.uk/learningenglish/english/features/english-at-work TRANSCRIPT Narrator: Hello. We're back at Tip Top Trading. Anna is very busy dealing with Mr Lime's big order for Imperial Lemons. (phone rings) Anna: Yes?... Who?... I can't hear you. Mr what? What? Mr Who? I don't know, you tell me. Oh, you are Mr Hu... H-U: Hu. Er... No, Tom's busy. Call back later. Bye. (hangs up) Tom, Mr Hu called you. Tom: Mr Hu- Anna: Mr Hu: H-U Tom: Anna, Mr Hu is a very important- (phone rings) Oh! What now?! (answers) Yes? Tom: (to himself) I'm going to have to talk to the boss about this. Anna: No. I'm busy, give me your number, I'll call you later. Yep, yep, 6... 8... thanks. Bye! (hangs up) Right, now where was I? Paul: Anna, could I have a word? Anna: Yes. (to herself) Ohhh, he must want to tell me how pleased he is with the Citrus Ventures deal. (door closing) Paul: Now, Anna... biscuit? Anna: Thank you. Paul: I'm a little bit concerned about something. Anna: (to herself/whispering) "I'm a little bit concerned..." Doesn't that mean something bad? Narrator: Yes, Anna, Paul is using a polite turn of phrase to say he is unhappy about something. Let's see what he's got to say.... Paul: I think you need to work on your telephone manner. Anna: Work on my telephone manner? Narrator: It means the way you talk on the phone is not good enough and you have to improve it – to work on it to make it better. Paul: Perhaps you should think about … Narrator: Perhaps you should think about – that's a polite way of telling you to do something! Paul: Anna, are you listening to me? Anna: Yes, sorry, I was just sort of, err, talking to myself. Could you repeat what you said please? Paul: Right, I'll start again. I said: I'm a little bit concerned about your telephone manner. You need to work on the way you speak to clients. Perhaps you should think about being a bit more polite to clients; it's important for the image of the company. Anna: Oh (close to tears) okay. Paul: You can go now – take another biscuit with you – that's my last chocolate wafer, you lucky thing! (door opens and closes) Denise: Anna? Is everything all right? Anna: (crying) Yes. Denise: What's the matter? Anna: (between sobs) Paul says I need to w-w-w-work on my telephone manner. Denise: Well I was a bit concerned about it myself. And I think Tom actually mentioned it to Paul. (Anna breaks down in renewed sobs). But, look, I'll help you if you like. I'm a bit of an expert on the phone. I'll give you some lessons. Anna: Oh thank you. Denise: Come in early tomorrow morning, before the others get here and we'll practise. Anna: Thank you Denise, that's very kind. Narrator: Wow! Denise is actually being nice to Anna. Amazing! Although from what I've heard of Denise on the phone, she's only ever gossiping with friends. Paul was very gentle and polite in the way he explained to Anna there was a problem and that she needed to improve some things. He used these phrases: I'm a little bit concerned about... You need to work on... Perhaps you should think about... Let's see if Denise manages to teach Anna anything useful next time. Until then!
Views: 59866 BBC Learning English
Learners' Questions: Using 'suppose' and 'supposed to'
 
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Sanmati from India says: People use 'suppose' and 'supposed to' a lot of the time in conversation. Can you please tell me in which sense and where they should be used? Dan has the answer. Watch the video and do the exercise here: http://www.bbc.co.uk/learningenglish/english/course/english-you-need/unit-27/session-5 Transcript Hi guys! Dan here for BBC Learning English with this week's Learner Question. Find out what it is after this. OK! This week's learner question comes from Sanmati from India, who writes: People use suppose and supposed to a lot of the time in conversation. Can you please tell me in which sense and where they should be used? Ok, Sanmati. Here we go. So, suppose can mean think, believe, imagine or expect, and in this sense, suppose is often used with negative structures when we hope the answer will be positive. For example: I don’t suppose you could lend me £20, could you? It is also used in short answers with the same meaning of think, believe, imagine, or expect, and note that two forms of the negative are possible. For example: Do you think he will be late? I suppose so. I suppose not. I don’t suppose so. Now, suppose and supposing can also be used in a completely different way to mean something like ‘what if’. And this is to introduce suggestions or to express fear. Now, note that the verb which follows suppose or supposing can be in the present tense or the past tense. So, for example: Suppose I come tomorrow instead of Friday, will that be ok? Or: Supposing I came tomorrow instead of Friday, would that be ok? We can also use the structure be supposed to plus the infinitive. And this means that something should be done because it is the law, the rule or the custom. However, in practice, it’s probably not done. For example: I’m supposed to clean my room before I go out, but I never do! Finally we can use the expression supposed to be to mean generally believed to be true by people. For example: This medicine’s supposed to be good for stomach cramps. Why don’t you try taking it? Finally, when you use supposed to in speech, note that the ‘d’ is not pronounced. It is pronounced suppose to. However, when you write it down, don’t forget the ‘d’, ok? I hope that answers your question Sanmati. Thank you very much for writing to us. If anybody else out there has a question for Learners’ Questions, you can email us on: [email protected] Please remember to put Learners’ Questions in the subject box and your name and where you’re writing from. We get a lot of emails, guys. I’m afraid we can’t answer every single one of them, but we do read them all. And for more information, go to our website bbclearningenglish.com. That’s it for this week’s Learners’ Questions. I’ll see you next time. Bye!
Views: 24905 BBC Learning English
Are you big on small talk? Learn what it means in The English We Speak
 
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What should you talk about when you meet someone for the first time? Here's a phrase to learn that describes making informal conversation about not much. It's a great way to break the ice but unfortunately it's something Feifei couldn't do on her blind date. Find out why and learn more about the expression in this programme. You'll find the transcript on our website: http://www.bbc.co.uk/learningenglish/english/features/the-english-we-speak/ep-190121 [Images: Getty Images] Learning English is easy! Improve your English with our free videos and lessons on grammar, vocabulary, pronunciation and English exams. Please use English when you comment. For more free English lessons and videos visit our website: http://www.bbclearningenglish.com
Views: 35790 BBC Learning English
Are there benefits to schadenfreude? Listen to 6 Minute English
 
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You'll find the transcript and vocabulary on our website: http://www.bbc.co.uk/learningenglish/english/features/6-minute-english/ep-190117 Do you take pleasure when someone undeserving of their success have a spot of bad luck? Not even a little pleasure? Well, if you do (like, apparently, most of us) you might like to learn the word 'schadenfreude' and the concept behind it. Rob and Neil talk about this German word also used in English and teach you new vocabulary. [Image: Getty Images] Learning English is easy! Improve your English with our free videos and lessons on grammar, vocabulary, pronunciation and English exams. Please use English when you comment. For more free English lessons and videos visit our website: http://www.bbclearningenglish.com
Views: 44676 BBC Learning English
A review of conditionals: BBC English Class
 
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What would Dan buy his mum if he won $1m? Dan's mum likes animals. That's why he'd buy her a horse if he won a lot of money. That's a conditional sentence - but do you know which type? If you've forgotten, don't worry - Dan's here with a 90-second review. For more, visit our website: http://www.bbc.co.uk/learningenglish/english/course/upper-intermediate/unit-28/session-1
Views: 33885 BBC Learning English
Learners' Questions: Wear, put on, dress
 
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Tugba from Turkey says: I would like to know the difference between wear, put on and dress. Dan has the answer. Watch the video and complete the activity here: http://www.bbc.co.uk/learningenglish/english/course/english-you-need/unit-24/session-5 Transcript Hi guys! Dan from BBC Learning English here with this week's Learner Question. Find out what it is after this. OK! This week's Learner Question comes from Tugba from Turkey, who writes: "Hello, I would like to know the difference between wear, put on and dress." It’s a good question, Tugba, and three very confusing words. I hope you like the answer. Here it comes. So, when you wear clothes, shoes or jewellery, you have them on your body. You can also wear your hair in a particular style. For example, I’m wearing a green shirt and a silver wedding ring. I usually wear my hair short. There is another meaning to wear, which is: become used and weaker over time, like the phrasal verb wear out. For example, I need to buy some new shoes. My old ones are getting worn out. This can also be applied to humans when they become tired. After a long day at work, I might say, I’m worn out. I need to go home. When you put clothes on, you place them on your body in order to wear them. Also, when you’ve finished wearing them, you take them off. First you put on, then you wear them, then you take them off. For example, this morning I put on this green shirt, and later I’ll take it off. You can also put on weight. This means to gain or accumulate kilograms. The opposite is to lose weight. For example, I thought I was going to put on weight on holiday last week, but I actually lost weight because I went swimming every day. When you dress, you put clothes on. If you dress up, then you wear smarter clothes than usual. Likewise, if you dress down then you wear less smart clothes than usual. We also talk about getting dressed as an alternative to the verb dress. And there’s little difference between them. For example, I need to dress. The taxi’s coming in twenty minutes. Or, I need to get dressed. The taxi’s coming in twenty minutes. No big deal. Other things you can dress are other people, such as children, you can dress a wound by cleaning it and covering it with a bandage and you can dress a salad by adding oil and vinegar to it. I hope that answers your question Tugba. Thank you very much for writing to us. If anybody else out there has a question for Learners’ Questions, you can email us on: [email protected] Please remember to put Learners’ Questions in the subject box and your name and where you’re writing from. We get a phenomenal amount of email, guys and we can’t answer every single one, but we do read all of them. And for more information, go to our website: bbclearningenglish.com. That’s it for this week’s Learners’ Questions. I’ll see you next time. Bye!
Views: 37607 BBC Learning English
Exercise helps the brain: BBC News Review
 
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Your brain will work better if you take regular exercise, according to a study. Vocabulary: sharp mentally quick and intelligent keep (something) at bay prevent (something) from happening stints limited periods of time spent doing an activity The story: A study says moderate exercise several times a week is the best way for the over 50s to keep their brains in good working order. Australian researchers say combining aerobic activities, such as swimming, cycling or jogging, with muscle-strengthening exercises is most effective. They support the idea that taking up exercise at any age is worthwhile. Neil and Catherine teach you how to use the language the world's media is using to discuss this story. [Image: GETTY IMAGES] For more, visit our website: http://www.bbc.co.uk/learningenglish/english/course/english-you-need/unit-12/session-2
Views: 587525 BBC Learning English
BBC English Masterclass: The future seen from the past
 
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Sometimes when we are talking about past events, we want to refer to something that was in the future at that time. Sian's here to show you five forms you can use talk about the future in the past - and she's going to take you back to the past to do this! For more, visit our website: http://www.bbc.co.uk/learningenglish/english/course/towards-advanced/unit-15/session-1 Transcript: Sian Hi Sian here for BBC Learning English - today is an exciting day because we are going to go back to the past and look at the future! So, you know that we have a past tense, a present tense, lots of future forms, but did you know we also have the future in the past? When we talk about the past, sometimes we want to talk about something that was in the future at that time - to do this we put the future forms into the past. I'm going to show you some examples of this and I'm going to take you back to the past to do this... Am/is/are going to becomes was/were going to (Earlier today... "It's such a nice day today - I'm going to go for a run at lunchtime!") Ah I was going to go for a run today, but I'm feeling a bit tired now! So, when we want to use the future in the past with 'going to', 'I am going to' becomes 'I was going to' - ''I was going to go for a run''. We can use this for predictions or intentions that change, like my intention to go for a run, or for things that did happen. So, "I knew it was going to be sunny today!" Pay attention to the pronunciation though - 'I was going to' when we speak quickly becomes 'I was gonna'. "I was gonna go for a run today, but I'm gonna have lunch instead'' Present continuous becomes past continuous (Earlier today: "I've got to go, I'm meeting Neil at 10 o'clock.") "Sorry I was in a rush earlier, I was meeting Neil at 10 o'clock and I didn't want to be late." So, we use the present continuous to talk about arrangements in the future. When we want to talk about the future in the past, this becomes becomes the past continuous. So, for example, "I was meeting a friend for lunch so I was in a hurry." We can also use for arrangements that didn't happen, but you intended them to happen. Will becomes would (Earlier today: "I've got to go Neil, I'll call you back later.") "Oh I told Neil I would call him later... I need to do that!" When referring to the future in the past will becomes would - "I said I'd call Neil." Remember we normally contract would to 'd. Am/are/is about to becomes was/were about to "Oh hang on a minute... I was about to call you Neil! No honestly, I was just about to call you." So, when we talk about the future - something that's going to happen in a short time, we use am about to "I'm about to call Neil". When we want to use this structure to talk about the future in the past, am about to becomes was about to. I was about to call Neil when he phoned me. Future perfect becomes would + have + past participle (Earlier today: "I think I'll have finished all my work by lunchtime.") "Ah it's almost lunchtime, I thought I'd have finished all my work by now... but it's taking ages!" So, when we talk about the future in the past using the future perfect, the future perfect form will have + past participle becomes would have + past participle. So, 'I will have finished' becomes 'I would have finished'. Pay attention to the contractions again, so instead of saying I would have, when we're speaking we say I'd've. 'I thought I'd've made more money by now!' Now, I was going to tell you all to go to our website bbclearningenglish.com for more information about the future in the past and to practise this... but you all know that already so I don't need to tell you! See you soon - Bye!
Views: 71527 BBC Learning English