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James May's 20th Century : Take Cover Documentary
 
29:09
Documentary series about 20th-century innovations. James May investigates Advances in warfare, including the development of camouflage, are discussed. Also: An early biplane is compared to a modern supersonic jet.
James May's 20th Century : Honey I Shrunk the World Documentary
 
29:11
James May concludes that the major breakthroughs in transportation over the last 100 years shrunk the world not by allowing us to see more of it, but--thanks to television, computers, and fiber optic cable--by increasingly bringing it to us.
James May's 20th Century : Blast Off Documentary
 
29:21
Documentary series about 20th-century innovations. James May investigates what the Space Race did for all of us who never got a chance to blast off into orbit, discovering that the race to the moon began in Chiswick, West London. James gets to road-test a street-legal version of the lunar buggy, but finds out gravity makes the handling difficult. After taking his own satellite photo from 700km above Earth, he then travels to NASA's launch pad in Florida to see for himself the massive Saturn moon rockets that he once made in kit-form in his bedroom.
Richard Hammond's Wild Weather : Water Documentary
 
58:01
Wild Weather with Richard Hammond : Water The Shape Shifter Episode 2: The host continues his investigation into the secrets of weather, focusing on the crucial role played by water, without which there would be no rain, no hail and no clouds. Mixing experiments with contributions from scientists, Richard goes in search of water in all its forms, discovering how rain could crush a car, trying to build his own cloud, getting involved in starting an avalanche and finding out how something as fragile as a snowflake can travel at speeds of up to 250mph on the ground.
The Krakatoa Volcano Documentary
 
42:34
On August 27th, 1883 a series of blasts on the island of Krakatoa culminated in a colossal explosion that blew the island apart in one of the largest eruptions in recorded history. We explore the underground forces that led to this extraordinary explosion that killed over 36,000 people and the devastation that it caused. But this is not just history because Anak Krakatoa (the Son of Krakatoa) is growing bigger and bigger and will blow again
Richard Hammond's Wild Weather: Temperature Documentary
 
58:01
Wild Weather with Richard Hammond : Temperature the Driving Force Episode 3 : Richard investigates the importance of heat - or the lack of it - when it comes to weather. And it isn't just a load of hot air. Without temperature, clouds, rain, snow, dust storms, thunder or lightning would be unable to form. Along the way he builds his own massive dust storm, discovering how sand from the Sahara bounces its way to the UK, and also drops in on a scientist who creates lightning bolts in his laboratory.
The Geological Formation Of Iceland Documentary
 
43:41
It is the largest and most fearsome volcanic island on the planet. We'll scour the island for clues, to address the mystery of what powerful forces are ripping Iceland apart and lighting its fiery volcanoes. Here, lava rips huge tears in the ground and new islands are born from the waves. Yet despite the active volcanoes, Iceland historically has been covered in and carved by ice. Fire and ice collide, locked in a titanic battle, as glaciers explode and cataclysmic floods decimate the landscape. But Iceland's volcanoes have had ramifications far beyond the shores of Iceland, causing climatic chaos and devastation across the planet; a fate which may one day happen again.
The Geological History Of Death Valley Documentary
 
42:46
A look at the geologic treasure trove of Death Valley; how one of the hottest places on Earth holds evidence for the coldest times on our planet; and how the valley, already well below sea level, is still sinking lower into the Earth.
Fukushima Nuclear Meltdown Disaster Documentary
 
53:16
NOVA reveals the minute-by-minute story of the Fukushima nuclear crisis—the one you know about, and the one you likely don’t: the perilously close call at the other Fukushima nuclear power plant a few miles away from the meltdowns. With unprecedented access inside both Fukushima nuclear power plants, NOVA speaks with workers who were there during the harrowing days—a crisis that began as a natural a disaster but was made worse by human beings. But why did the worst happen at one plant while another that faced nearly identical challenges emerged unscathed? It may come down to the skill and knowledge of one man, who has worked there since they started construction. These are crucial questions as the company that runs both plants, TEPCO, tries to clean up an unprecedented radioactive mess and reintroduce nuclear power to Japan.
Extreme Fishing : New Zealand Documentary
 
45:11
Series 2 Episode 2 : Having travelled to New Zealand's North Island, Robson Green meets the record-breaking Kiwi fisherman, Geoff Stone who helps him to hunt for hapuka. Green then celebrates his birthday with the Maori people, enjoying a feast of mussels caught on the Waitangi River.
Archaeology : India The First Civilization Documentary
 
51:55
As Indian independence approached in the first half of the 20th century, British archaeologists John Hubert Marshall and Sir Mortimer Wheeler worked at breakneck speed to understand the great ancient civilisations of the subcontinent, which the British Empire had ruled for a mere 200 years. The British archaeologists and their Indian colleagues succeeded in identifying the Indus civilisation, a sophisticated culture up to 4000 years old whose towns and cities built of clay bricks extended over a vast area - apparently without the use of a written language. But as they worked on, in peace and then in war, the archaeologists found themselves faced with a familiar question. Was this advanced Indus civilisation peaceful, or was it forged and maintained through cruel wars?
Bigfoot : Advanced Scientific Analysis Documentary
 
45:44
A team of experts uses advanced scientific analysis to verify or debunk evidence of bigfoot.
Tiff Needell's The Crashes That Changed Racing Documentary
 
47:44
Racing is all about winning, and to win one has to be at and push to the edge of disaster. Over the years of automotive racing much improvements have been made and today one could almost say the sport is safe. But, history can not be forgotten, with so many great drivers had lost their lives which pushed the teams to build a safer vehicle. This video is about those drivers that changed racing.
Shipwrecks Britain's Sunken History Documentary
 
58:55
Shipwrecks are the nightmare we have forgotten - the price Britain paid for ruling the waves from an island surrounded by treacherous rocks. The result is a coastline that is home to the world's highest concentration of sunken ships. But shipwrecks also changed the course of British history, helped shape our national character and drove innovations in seafaring technology, as well as gripping our imagination. Mutiny, murder and mayhem on the high seas as Sam Willis takes the story of shipwrecks into the Georgian age when Britain first began to rule the waves. But with maritime trade driving the whole enterprise, disasters at sea imperilled all this. As key colonies were established and new territories conquered, the great sailing ships became symbols of the power of the Georgian state - and the shipwreck was to be its Achilles' heel. By literally turning this world upside down, mutinous sailors, rebellious slaves and murderous wreckers threatened to undermine Britain's ambitions and jeopardise its imperial venture.
James May's 20th Century : Big City, Bright Lights Documentary
 
34:20
Each day 180,000 people move into a city somewhere on the planet. James May investigates how the high-rise urban living condition was created.
Extreme Fishing : Spain Documentary
 
44:04
Episode 4: Robson trawls the North Atlantic for blue marlin, samples a marine delicacy in the Canary Islands, and hunts a giant catfish in Spain.
Extreme Fishing: Northern Australia Documentary
 
45:10
Travelling from New Zealand to Australia Robson Green tries his hand at barramundi fishing, but he gets more than he bargained for when he faces the crocodile-infested waters of Carmor Plains Wildlife Reserve. He also learns how to catch milkfish (using a laof of bread) and sport fish (by 'surface popping').
Richard Hammond's Wild Weather : Wind Documentary
 
57:59
Wild Weather with Richard Hammond : Wind The Invisible Force Episode 1 : The first instalment focuses on wind, and sees the presenter brave temperatures of -45C on top of Mount Washington in New Hampshire, where in 1934 the highest wind speed ever measured on land - 231mph - was recorded. Richard investigates how wind actually starts, walks into the centre of a man-made tornado and employs fire to make a 10m-high whirlwind.
The Mary Rose Shipwreck Documentary
 
59:05
Historian Dan Snow explores the greatest maritime archaeology project in British history - the Mary Rose. Using 40 years of BBC archive footage Dan charts how the Mary Rose was discovered, excavated and eventually raised, and what the latest research has revealed about this iconic ship and her crew. Dan also investigates how the Mary Rose project helped create modern underwater archaeology, examining the techniques, challenges and triumphs of the divers and archaeologists involved.
The San Andreas Fault Documentary
 
43:49
How the Earth Was Made San Andreas Fault - Series 1 Episode 1 The San Andreas Fault runs roughly 800 miles through some of the most valuable real estate in the world. The southern section hasn't had a significant quake for over 300 years and is now primed and ready for another "big one." This new series takes a trip along the most famous fault line in the world and examine the geology that gives it its immense destructive power The History of earth series on Planet Kaos subscribe for regular videos
Vesuvius The Worlds Most Dangerous Volcano Documentary
 
42:38
Mt Vesuvius is the world's most dangerous volcano, and it threatens three million people. It was responsible for the most famous natural disaster of ancient history, the eruption that destroyed the Roman city of Pompeii. And its most recent blast was caught on film in 1944. Today Vesuvius is the most densely populated volcano in the world. Now recent scientific discoveries show that it is capable of an eruption larger than ever before thought possible and that hidden beneath Vesuvius there is a vast magma chamber of boiling hot rock, ready to come out.
Extreme Fishing: South Australia Documentary
 
45:09
Robson Green clambers into a reinforced steel cage off the coast of southern Australia to dive for abalone in the shark-infested waters just south of Port Lincoln. Then, travelling to Perth, he tries to catch blue manna crab for a traditional Australia Day barbecue.
Extreme Survival : Australian Outback Documentary
 
29:27
In 1998, two tourists set off into the Australian outback – but only one of them returned alive. Ray investigates their tragic story.
Extreme Fishing: Thailand Documentary
 
45:04
Robson Green checks out the hottest fishing destinations around the globe. Starting in Thailand, where he samples the delights of Bangkok's infamous fish market, then to the River Kwai, where he spends a night on a raft in the middle of a lake
Secrets of York Castle Documentary
 
43:59
In this episode, Dan Jones is exploring the medieval capital of the North: York. Built by William the Conqueror, York Castle was once the regional seat of the British government and was used as a prison and a royal mint. Before William The Conqueror settled into the North however, he had to fight off the Vikings. The Vikings first arrived in York in 866, led by the colorfully named Ivor the Boneless. Jones visits a Viking village and learns how to fight in the manner of the Vikings. In 1190, York Castle was the site of one of the worst pogroms in English history. A Yorkshire landholder indebted to a Jewish merchant exploited an accidental house fire to incite a mob to attack the Jews. The Jews took refuge in York Castle as the mob surrounded it. Besieged for days, the Rabbi inside proposed an act of collective suicide, rather than give themselves up to the mob. Others burned to death in a fire started in the wooden keep. A few surrendered, promising to convert to Christianity, but they were killed anyway by the angry crowd. One hundred fifty Jews died in total. Jones learns about the life of a medieval knight and tries on armor like a Knight Templar would have worn, a special branch of knights referred to as "warrior monks." Twenty-five Templars were imprisoned in York Castle and interrogated on the charge of heresy, idolatry, and other crimes. Jones visits York Minster where they stood trial to learn more about their story. Dan Jones also visits the cell in which legendary highwayman Dick Turpin was imprisoned. Over the years many myths have grown up around the man but Jones poses the question, who was the real Dick Turpin?
Richard Hammond's Jungle Quest Documentary Episode 1
 
44:22
Since he was eight years old, Richard Hammond's dream has been to be a wildlife photographer in the Amazon rainforest. But life got in the way and, for more than 35 years, he's been unable to fulfil his ambition. Until now... thanks to two special one-hour films he presents in support of Sky Rainforest Rescue, Sky's partnership with WWF, which has helped save one billion trees in the Amazon rainforest. Filmed in the Brazilian rainforest, it charts Hammond's journey along the mighty Amazon River and deep into the jungle as he attempts to photograph the creatures that captivated him all those years ago. Along the way, he's treated to unique wildlife encounters as he enters the river with pink river dolphins and rescues an entangled sloth. It's not all plain sailing, though, as he battles heat, humidity and torrential rain. He also confronts personal phobias when he comes face-to-face with giant spiders, feels the wrath of bullet ants and must conquer his fear of heights when he is hoisted high into the forest canopy. Estimates suggest that, in the years since the eight-year-old Richard first dreamed of visiting the Amazon, approximately 20 per cent of the South American rainforest has been destroyed. Aiming to inspire a new generation to become guardians of this unique eco-system, Hammond plans to exhibit his photos at home for local schoolchildren. It's a noble quest, but with weather, photo opportunities and time stacked against him, can he deliver? In this first of two films, Hammond is on the mighty Amazon itself, leaving the main river to enter the flooded forest in tiny dug-out canoes. It soon becomes apparent that the inhabitants of the Amazon are not keen to play ball when Richard struggles to even see the creatures spotted by his guide Eduardo, let alone photograph them. However, hours of frustration are finally rewarded when Richard enjoys once-in-a-lifetime encounters with sloths and Pink River Dolphins. Episode 2 : https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=s21osNtt7DY
Britain's Biggest Warship : Out with the Old in with the New Episode 3
 
58:57
Britain's Biggest Warship : Out with the Old in with the New Episode 3 HMS Queen Elizabeth approaches the climax of her sea trials in the North Sea. The automatic flight deck fire-fighting system is a major innovation on board but must now be tested for the first time. The new super carrier makes a special and poignant visit to Scapa Flow in the Orkneys to mark an astonishing naval centenary - it is 100 years to the day that an aircraft was successfully landed on a moving vessel but with ultimately tragic consequences. The Queen Elizabeth then moves at full speed to rendezvous with American carrier USS George Bush and a major battle group of international warships.
Britain's Biggest Warship: Crewing Up Episode 1
 
58:59
Britains Biggest Warship : Crewing Up Episode 1 In this first episode, Film-maker Chris Terrill captures an intimate and personal portrait of life on board ultra-modern super aircraft carrier HMS Queen Elizabeth, as its crew learns the intricacies of a warship that will change the way Britain goes to war. In this first instalment, early 2016 sees sailors begin to arrive in Rosyth dockyard in Scotland where the ship is still in construction, but nearing completion. Captain Jerry Kyd and his 700 sailors are assembling to take the prototype warship to sea for the first time. These trials herald what should be 50 years of service. Episode 2: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ZwW5YBCiT3s
The History of Radio Documentary
 
44:32
Early in the 20th century, Marconi and Tesla experimented with wireless radio waves. When voice was added, radio became a cultural phenomenon, bringing information and entertainment into homes across the world. This program looks at the technology behind wireless communications.
Extreme Fishing: South Africa Documentary
 
44:55
Episode 3: Robson travels to South Africa, where he finds himself in shark-infested waters while paddle skiing. He also tries his hand at reef fishing in a bid to land the biggest salmon of his career.
Extreme Fishing: Southern USA Documentary
 
45:12
Episode 2: For the second leg of his adventure, Robson heads to the Tennessee river in the Deep South of the USA to try 'catfish grabbling'. This perilous sport involves catching giant catfish without using rods.
Extreme Fishing: Kenya Documentary
 
44:52
The actor heads for the east coast of Kenya, where the Indian Ocean offers some of the best game fishing in the world. Joining a local expert, he encounters a large wahoo fish while searching for the elusive dorado, before going back to basics to learn a traditional fishing technique that consists of just lines and bare hands. Robson also visits Lake Victoria, where an unusual method is employed to catch whitebait
Britains Jurassic Coast Documentary
 
47:00
Walking Through Time Episode 3 Jurassic Coast The Jurassic Coast needs no introduction, really. But I think you’d be hard pressed to find a more stunning shot of the Lulworth Crumple. I go from Kimmeridge Bay to Budleigh Salterton, investigating anoxia from local to global scales with Paul Wignall. I get to meet palaeontologist Simon Penn, who is rapidly becoming the heir to Steve Etches, and his gorgeous fossils. I have a cuppa with Kevan Sheehan, who discovered an incredibly complete giant Pliosaur skull at Osmington Mills (and had it named in honour of all the Kev’s in the world). Hillary Ketchum is my expert guide to that pliosaur. And Eliza Howlett and I have the most trowelblazer-tastic time talking Mary Anning and Eliza Philpott in Lyme Regis. And we have a bit of a Landmark Trust love in. Oh, and underwater robot vehicle REX returns, ably assisted by Adrian Glover and Leigh Marsh.
Extreme Fishing: Philippines Documentary
 
45:01
In the Philippines, Robson Green begins a hunt for the highly intelligent green and blue dorado and then finds and eats a jellyfish.
The Geological History Of The Rockies Documentary
 
42:33
From Alaska to New Mexico, the Rockies are one of the great mountain belts of the world--caused by tectonic forces of the Pacific Plate pushing against the North American continent. They have formed as the earth's continental crust has been shortened under pressure--by around 1 inch a year. What's more, they are still rising and they are still young in geologic terms: when the dinosaurs roamed the Earth they had not even started to form.
Extreme Fishing: Eastern Seaboard USA Documentary
 
44:06
Keen fisherman Robson Green travels to the eastern seaboard of the United States to hunt for shark and endangered bluefin tuna. He then attempts to catch lobster and striped bass before heading to Niagara Falls in search of the legendary steelhead fighting fish.
How the Brooklyn Bridge was Built Documentary
 
45:43
The Brooklyn Bridge was not only a landmark, but also the first bridge of its kind. No one had ever used steel for construction, nor used cables of metal, nor built a suspension bridge so long. Until one man dared to try. In 19th-century New York, where buildings were no more than five stories tall, engineer John Roebling’s soaring and majestic Brooklyn Bridge was nothing short of a technological miracle. But Roebling's innovation led to an uphill battle against the elements, corrupt politicians, and scientists who claimed the first strong wind would collapse the bridge to rubble.
Britain's Biggest Warship : In at the Deep End Episode 2
 
59:00
Britain's Biggest Warship : In at the Deep End Episode 2 HMS Queen Elizabeth goes on dangerous sea trials for the first time in the North Sea, where every part of the vessel is put to the test and the first aircraft lands on the deck. After a few days at sea, the first problems start to emerge, including an explosion, a dangerous fuel leak, and some strange noises. Meanwhile, a crew member reveals how the Navy helped him make a fresh start from a life of crime, and the ship's Muslim chef works out how to cook pork without offending his religion. Episode 3: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=mHFYTYqnZ5M
Extreme Fishing: China Documentary
 
45:03
The actor casts off in the Chinese regions of Zhejiang and Xiu Shan, where fishing is a very important skill. At Qiando Lake he joins 100 locals in trying to land a bighead carp and samples the revered catch. More culinary experiences await as a result of Green's hunt for octopus, and he tries his hand at cormorant fishing - but has trouble restraining his bird's constant efforts to escape
Richard Hammond's Jungle Quest Documentary Episode 2
 
44:24
Since he was eight years old, Richard Hammond's dream has been to be a wildlife photographer in the Amazon rainforest. But life got in the way and, for more than 35 years, he's been unable to fulfil his ambition. Until now... thanks to two special one-hour films he presents in support of Sky Rainforest Rescue, Sky's partnership with WWF, which has helped save one billion trees in the Amazon rainforest. Filmed in the Brazilian rainforest, it charts Hammond's journey along the mighty Amazon River and deep into the jungle as he attempts to photograph the creatures that captivated him all those years ago. Along the way, he's treated to unique wildlife encounters as he enters the river with pink river dolphins and rescues an entangled sloth. It's not all plain sailing, though, as he battles heat, humidity and torrential rain. He also confronts personal phobias when he comes face-to-face with giant spiders, feels the wrath of bullet ants and must conquer his fear of heights when he is hoisted high into the forest canopy. Estimates suggest that, in the years since the eight-year-old Richard first dreamed of visiting the Amazon, approximately 20 per cent of the South American rainforest has been destroyed. Aiming to inspire a new generation to become guardians of this unique eco-system, Hammond plans to exhibit his photos at home for local schoolchildren. It's a noble quest, but with weather, photo opportunities and time stacked against him, can he deliver? In the last episode in this series which sees Richard making his way along the Amazon River and rainforest to fulfil a childhood dream and photograph their wildlife. Tonight he will be facing biting ants, overcoming a personal phobia when he comes face-to-face with giant spiders, and tries to conquer his fear of heights when he is hoisted high into the forest canopy. Hold up... giant spiders??!! Episode 1 : https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=jjtojuvIJtY
The Geological History of Earths Deadliest Eruption Documentary
 
42:56
A look back 250 million years ago when a massive volcanic eruption, (in what is now Siberia), spewed lava one mile thick over an area the size of Texas and caused intense climatic change that killed 95% of the life on the planet; paving the way for the next dominant species – the dinosaurs.
History of the Potato Documentary
 
41:59
It is among the most versatile, nutritious, and varied foodstuffs in the world, the potato is the ultimate comfort food.
Richard Hammond's Guy Fawkes and The Gunpowder Plot Documentary
 
01:01:56
Richard Hammond's Guy Falks and The Gunpowder Plot Exploding the Legend: Four hundred years after Guy Fawkes attempted to blow up the House of Lords, an ambitious ITV experiment hopes to reveal what would have happened if he had got away with his plot. The story is known to every British schoolchild. On the 5th November 1605 Guy Fawkes was poised to blow up Parliament and murder the King. His plan failed when he was dramatically discovered holding the fuse, and bonfires have been lit ever since. But one big question still remains‚Would his plot have worked had he not been caught. To coincide with the 400th anniversary of the original gunpowder plot ITV is going to go a step further than Fawkes to answer that all important question. Presenter Richard Hammond will mount the biggest historical and scientific experiment ever seen on television: he will search out the 17th century gunpowder recipe used by Fawkes and his fellow conspirators before detonating 36 barrels of the explosive in a full-sized replica of the original House of Lords. Based on expert designs, the basement where the gunpowder was hidden will be structurally exact and with the same ballistic characteristics as the original, while the Lord‚Äôs Chamber above will be laden with perishable cameras, sensors and crash test dummies to represent the King and members of Parliament. Could any of England‚Äôs 150 most rich and powerful have survived the blast? How much of Westminster village would have been destroyed? What would London have looked like post detonation.
The Geological Formation of Hawaii Documentary
 
43:59
The Hawaiian Islands are the most remote island chain on the planet. Emerging in the center of the Pacific, their origins have remained a puzzle for generations. Follow the story of the attempts to try and understand these beautiful, yet violent islands. It is a story of raging volcanoes, vast landslides, mega-tsunamis and strange forces emerging from the bowels of the planet. It reveals that Hawaii's Big Island is over 25 times bigger than Mt. Everest, that the entire Island chain is disappearing faster than any other land mass on Earth, and that volcanoes here might hold essential clues as to the inner workings of our planet.
The Great Atlantic Ocean Liners Documentary Episode 1
 
50:02
This four-part series from A&E charts the history of luxury liners that crossed the Atlantic, accommodating the elegant rich with luxury quarters, ballrooms, and swimming pools -- often while poor immigrants traveled below the deck. Such famous ships as the Queen Mary, the Mauritania, the Queen Elizabeth II, the Andrea Doria, the Lusitania, and the Normandie are featured. The great ocean liners of the Atlantic were the largest and most opulent passenger ships ever built, they carried the privileged, survived tragedy, and symbolized splendor. In their glorious heyday, it was as if the finest hotels and most magnificent estates of the Western World had been put to sea. Floating Palaces sets sail on a grand tour of the transatlantic liners, from the ultra-luxurious staterooms and private swimming pools of the elite to the below-deck accommodations of less fortunate immigrant travelers. Hear the real stories of the people who built and sailed aboard them and visit their renowned ports of call. Follow the great ships as they are drafted into combat and witness the haunting tragedies that led the Lusitania, Titanic and Andrea Doria to their doom. Floating Palaces is an unforgettable look at the most spectacular ships ever built. Embark upon the QEII, the Lusitania, the Normandie and more. Floating Palaces: The Great Atlantic Liners Documentary Episode 1
Secrets Of Warwick Castle Documentary
 
43:39
Dan explores the history of Warwick Castle, which started as a motte and bailey fort established by William the Conqueror in 1068 and was transformed into a stone fortress two centuries later by the Beauchamp family. He examines the role Guy Beauchamp played in the kidnapping and murder of one of Edward II's closest allies and descends into the castle's claustrophobic dungeon. Secrets of Great British Castles Series 1: Carrickfergus Dan Jones explores the history of Carrickfergus Castle in Co Antrim, one of the most ancient castles in Northern Ireland and a stronghold key to understanding the tempestuous relationship between Britain and Ireland. Dan travels to Rathlin Island, where he reveals how hundreds of women and children were massacred in the name of Elizabeth I, and visits the tomb of former governor Arthur Chichester, who began a new colonisation strategy using scorched earth tactics and laid waste to much of the land surrounding the town. Secrets Of Great British Castles Series 1 Episode 3 Warwick
Extreme Fishing : Alaska Documentary
 
45:06
Series 2 Episode 2 : Robson Green attempts to to fulfil his lifelong dream by catching a giant salmonbraves in the icy Alaskan wilderness. Later he learns how to fish on a frozen lake and then he travels to Seward Harbour to search for cod.
Bigfoot and the Native Americans Documentary
 
44:55
Bigfoot researchers trek into California's Sierra Nevada following Native American stories and petroglyphs of a supposed family of hairy man-beasts; they examine recently found footprint evidence and a compelling 1991 video of a supposed Sasquatch encounter in Mono Lake.
Secrets of Arundel Castle Documentary
 
43:42
Dan Jones is in the heart of the English countryside at Arundel Castle. Though it may appear tranquil today, for centuries this picture perfect castle had its share of turbulent times. Apart from the occasional reversion to the Crown, from 1138 to the present day Arundel Castle has been carried by female heiresses from the d'Albinis to the FitzAlans in the 13th century and then from the FitzAlans to the Howards in the 16th century. But the fate of the Earls of Arundel has been tumultuous to say the least. Jones meets a weapons expert who shows him how knights like Richard FitzAlan, third Earl of Arundel, would have fought in the 100 Year War with France and debunks the myth that swords were heavy and cumbersome to use. Arundel has been the seat of the Dukes of Norfolk and their ancestors for over 850 years. The Duke of Norfolk is the Premier Duke and Arundel's fortunes rose and fell along with those of the Howard family. Arguably, no other English family has had such a dramatic history as the Howard's — and Jones tells that story. Finally, Jones meets a Social Historian who gives him a better insight into the realities of living in a castle and how Arundel Castle would have prepared for Queen Victoria's visit in 1846.
Geology : Salt Tears of the Earth Documentary
 
50:07
There are millions of solutions to the problems of survival but there is only one substance that has awakened all organisms to life: salt. No creature can live without this magic mineral - and no living organism can produce it on its own.

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